DRAKE VS PUSHA T ARE FANS TAKING RAP BEEFS TOO SERIOUSLY

first_img Facebook Advertisement NWA versus Ice Cube. Biggie versus Tupac. Nas versus Jay Z. Nicki Minaj versus ​Remy Ma.Rivalries and beefs are a longstanding tradition in hip hop, from b-boys and b-girls battling it out in dance to rappers trading lyrical barbs, live or via diss tracks. But fans taking an artistic battle from a performance space into the real world is rare and surprising, according to hip-hop writer A. Harmony.“Battle rap is a fixture in hip hop. It’s considered a sport. It’s considered a form of entertainment and a chance for MCs to really showcase their skills. It’s a part of the music industry. It’s a part of the music culture,” explained Harmony, hip hop contributor to Exclaim Magazine. Advertisement But a full-on brawl ensued at a Pusha T concert in Toronto on Tuesday, after some audience members apparently tossed drinks onstage at the American rapper — who has been embroiled in an on-again, off-again beef with hometown favourite Drake — mid-performance. Briefly retaking the stage, the Virginia rapper seemed to accuse Drake of being behind the slight. The concert was closed down shortly after. Later, a concertgoer turned up at a nearby hospital with stab wounds, according to police.Note: strong language and violence in following videoThe drinks being tossed might have been something “between concertgoers that got out of hand,” said Harmony. It might also have been the result of fans “who decided to take this form of entertainment and turn it into something it wasn’t.”In recent years, there has been a noticeable rise in young music fans lashing out at rivals for perceived slights to their idols, whether its Beliebers rallying behind Justin Bieber or the BeyHive lashing out in support of Beyoncé.“We have seen instances of super fans kind of crossing the line,” Harmony noted, citing an instance this July when Nicki Minaj fans waged a brutal campaign against a Canadian freelance writer who offered a negative critique of the rapper’s music.Different kind of connectionToday’s fans aren’t like those of previous generations. They feel a different, closer connection to their idols thanks to social media — and that goes for rap aficionados as well, according to Emmanuel Tabi, a hip-hop fan and University of Toronto PhD candidate examining cultural production and its intersection with education and activism. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Rap beefs are a longstanding hip hop tradition. But have some fans taken the feud between Pusha T and Drake too far? (Getty Images) Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img

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