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Hinds must go! … Ramdin tells WIPA boss to resign

first_imgWest Indies wicketkeeper and batsman Denesh Ramdin has called for West Indies Players Association (WIPA) President and Chief Executive Officer Wavell Hinds to resign amid the latter’s handling of recent West Indies players salary negotiations. Commenting via his Twitter account @shotta8080, Ramdin said Hinds, through his salary negotiations with the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB), had let down “everyone”, and as such should step aside. “Is this man for real. It’s like he never play the game. By the way there is no one in the team with A+ contract,” Ramdin said in response to media statements made by Hinds earlier this week in relation to the new payment structures for West Indies players. “Hinds u (you) need to go, big man thing, you have let down everyone, sorry to say, jump on your bike. Too much friend thing going on in our cricket. “Represent players behind there (their) back an (and) saying is best interest after LOL (laugh out loud) joking,” added Ramdin. Hinds, in responding to recent claims made by top West Indies batsman Marlon Samuels that players are being paid less in comparison to previous years, stated that this was not necessarily the case. The WIPA boss, who has been in the post for four years, said what obtains instead was a virtual redistribution of player incomes to West Indies players to reflect the changing global cricket landscape. “He (Samuels) said he was getting US$17,500 before his salary was cut to US$5,000. Marlon is a retained player and gets a monthly salary and then match fees. If he doesn’t play cricket, he (still) gets a salary each month,” said Hinds. The former West Indies batsman went on to further explain that what Samuels was referring to with regards to receiving US$17,500 was based on the WICB paying players directly from what it gained from team sponsorship. Instead, Hinds explained that what the board had done was to increase the threshold of retainer contracts, as well as pay first-class players for their participation in the recently introduced WICB Professional League. “What the WICB did was to move the US$35,000 into the retainer fee, which has been ramped up. The match fees right now are as follows; Test Match – US$5,750, ODI US$2,300, and T20I US$1,750,” remarked Hinds. The former big-hitting left-hander, who also shares executive positions with WICB President Dave Cameron at Kensington Cricket Club in Jamaican, also went on to explain the current annual retainer fee structure for the 15 contracted West Indies players. He said that US$150,000 was now offered for A+ contracted player, US$135,000 for A, US$120,000 for B+, US$115,000 for B, and US$100,000 for category C. This original contract categories, Hinds pointed out, used to see players receiving US$105,000 for a A+ contract, US$80,000 for A, US$53,000 for a B, and US$30,000 for C. The 31-year-old Ramdin’s comments also come in wake of Instagram posts by West Indies’ talismanic opener Chris Gayle, who, last week, called for a “shake-up” at WIPA. PLAYERS GETTING LESS PAYlast_img read more

CHELSEA VS SWANSEA CITY

first_imgCHELSEA (4-2-3-1)COURTOIS, IVANOVIC, CAHILL, TERRY, AZPILICUETA, MATIC, FABREGAS, WILLIAN, OSCAR, HAZARD, COSTASWANSEA (4-2-3-1)AYEW, MONTERO, SIGURDSSON, DYER, SHELVEY, CORK, TAYLOR, FERNANDEZ, WILLIAMS, RANGEL, FABIANSKIChelsea begin the defence of their Barclays Premier League title and are bidding to retain it for the first time in their 110-year history, after four championship successes in the last 10 years.The Blues should be confident; in 23 opening-day fixtures in the Premier League they have lost just three, the most recent in August 1998, at Coventry. Since then, Chelsea have played 16 first-day fixtures, winning 14 and drawing two.And they last lost the first game of the season at Stamford Bridge in August 1993, when they were beaten 2-1 by Blackburn Rovers.More reasons for JosÈ Mourinho’s men to be confident are last season’s games against Swansea City; Chelsea won 4-2 at home against the Welshmen and 5-0 at the Liberty Stadium.Furthermore, in 13 visits to Stamford Bridge Swansea have won just once – in 1925. Since that victory 90 years ago, the Swans have drawn three and lost nine.Indeed, in the Premier League, Swansea have lost all four visits while conceding 11 goals and scoring just three. Overall they have lost on their last five visits, conceding 17.Chelsea have doubts over striker Diego Costa, who missed the 1-0 Community Shield defeat by Arsenal last weekend with a hamstring problem.Mourinho started with Loic Remy against the Gunners and could be tempted to give a first start to Radamel Falcao, signed on loan from AS Monaco – to replace the departed Didier Drogba – after a similar spell at Manchester United last season.Swansea, who lost their last two Premier League games of last season, will be tempted to give a league debut to Andre Ayew, signed in the summer from Marseille.last_img read more

On ISSA, schoolboy football and unruly behaviour

first_img dangerous behaviour This reprimand is so numbing in its inappropriateness, that it boggles my mind. Perpetrators of such rank indiscipline and potentially dangerous behaviour should not be allowed access to further games involving that school. That is a given, even if it means that ISSA will not be able to collect gate receipts that can offset the cost of putting on the game. At some stage, Jamaicans must realise that if the cost of unruly and dangerous behaviour is far less than the reward for unruly and dangerous behaviour, then no amount of divine intervention will curtail future similar occurrences. Giving a ‘bly’ If the people who murder our fellow citizens and rape our women and children thought for a moment that being caught and punished was a reality instead of the present 80% chance that their identity will remain unknown, or if by some stroke of luck they are indicted, then a good lawyer and the ability to have prosecution postponed year after year will almost guarantee no punishment. It is the little things that matter. The New York City mayor and police force recognised some years ago, that if you start by fixing the broken windows and prosecuting anyone who breaks the law (riding on the sidewalk for example), crime statistics will dramatically be reduced. This attitude of giving a ‘bly’ only serves to incentivise miscreants. After the weeping and wailing of those justifiably severely punished for ‘stoning the ref’, such incidents will cease, thus improving spectator comfort, sending a message to the children who attend the schools and eventually improving revenue as more supporters and spectators will feel that their safety and the spirit of sport are in good hands. Football in particular, and sport in general, is a part of the holistic education of our children and our people. It must never be the ‘reason’ to go to school! The school teams are now sponsored (some more than others) and it seems as if the other aspects of school life are now on the back-burner. The playing surfaces remain woeful and the prevailing drought conditions are definitely not helpful. In the ISSA-controlled schoolboy competition, night games are being introduced for what can only be described as ‘revenue enhancement’. I suppose it matters not if children coming home from night games are exposed to increased danger from ‘evil’, as long as ISSA collects at the gate, (“ah-nuh-nutten”). Already there are reports of coaches of “small” schools complaining bitterly of the poaching of talented youngsters by affiliates of “big” schools, despite the welcome efforts of the Ministry of Education to minimise this nefarious practice. The administration of activities in any civilised society depends on the strict adherence to agreed rules by the participants. Rules that are broken or ignored will only serve to incentivise those looking on to “act accordingly” if the cost of breaking a rule is far less than the benefit derived from adhering to the rule. It now seems (to me) that if the supporters of a school do not agree with a referee’s decision in a closely contested game, then by all means “stone the ref” and cause the game to be abandoned. The team was going to lose the match anyway, but now the ref (or any other authoritative figure) will be well aware that “when-it-comes-to-this-school… no bother mek we lose!” .(stoning the ref) be rewarded by a loss of points and “don’t do it again.”last_img read more

Dr. Paul Wright argues about drug testing/spiking

first_img tremendous increase Drug-testing experts have noticed a tremendous increase in the size, strength, and speed of players in international rugby since the sport went professional in 1995. Surveys done in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa have indicated that among the young, steroid use is much greater than 10 per cent. However, in these countries, there’s a paucity of drug testing in schools and clubs, where the temptation to dope is high, due to the reluctance of doping authorities to test in schools, and the relatively little financial resources to extend testing to clubs, not involved in international competition. In Jamaica, the new and impressive JADCO website gives no indication of testing by sport, so we do not know if rugby is one of the many sports under the scrutiny of the local testing agency. What we do know is that when it comes to doping, there is a very obvious ‘Catch 22’: Take it seriously and catch people (because there are cheats in every area of human activity), or pretend to take it seriously and catch nobody. Do the former and you have a drug problem. do the latter and no problem – until a superstar makes a mistake and the edifice of propriety collapses. British online media have been reporting on the out-of-competition activities of a Jamaican superstar, with a letter writer to a Jamaican newspaper wondering about the possibility of the superstar imbibing ‘spiked’ drinks at one of the establishments where he has been filmed. This concern ties in with the allegation in Jamaica that sporting superstars have been known to order take-out food in their own name and personally come to pick it up minutes later. The national disaster that would accompany a subsequent test that revealed an adverse analytical finding in a test done after a meal spiked by (paid) accomplices of jealous competitors would demand that JADCO-sponsored seminars re the dangers of using banned substances and supplements be mandatory for elite athletes, with serious sanctions for those who consistently ‘have other engagements’ when these seminars are put on. No one wants to curtail the fun of any young sports superstar, but the fact that young, rich stars attract friends with ulterior motives cannot and must not be overstressed and ignored. A word to the wise is sufficient. The World Championships in rugby enters its knockout stage this week, with the main stories focusing on the capitulation of the England team to Australia in a dramatic win-or-go-home match, thus becoming the first host to be eliminated from the competition before the quarter-finals; and the claims by a 20-year-old British player, Daniel Spencer-Tonks, that doping “is widespread” in the sport. Spencer-Tonks is a former under-15 international player, who was caught using the banned steroid stanozolol in February this year and who received a four-year ban from the United Kingdom Anti-Doping Agency (UKAD). As can be expected, the anti-doping testers in rugby in Britain have trotted out their statistics to reveal that of all the tests done, in and out of competition, only about 10 per cent reveal adverse analytical findings. They also state that more than 50 per cent of their tests are based on information received (target testing). This contrast (‘widespread doping’ versus ‘less than 10 per cent of tests positive’) highlights the belief that a significant percentage of sportsmen (and women) throughout all sports are using dope to cope with the demands of professional sports.last_img read more

Openers perish to leave WI with uphill task

first_img SRI LANKA 1st innings To bat: J Blackwood, D Ramdin, *J Holder, D Bishoo, J Taylor, K Roach, S Gabriel Fall of wickets: 1-33 (Brathwaite), 2-49 (Hope). Bowling: Prasad 4-3-4-0, Pradeep 5-0-29-0, Herath 8-2-14-2, Kaushal 4-1-91-0. Position: West Indies trail by 418 runs with eight wickets intact. Toss: Sri Lanka. UMPIRES: Marais Erasmus, Richard Illingworth; TV – Simon Fry. (overnight 250 for two) D. Karunaratne c and b Samuels 186 D. Chandimal c Blackwood b Taylor 151 *A. Mathews c & b Holder 48 M. Siriwardana c wk Ramdin b Taylor 1 +K. Perera b Gabriel 23 D. Prasad c Holder b Bishoo 13 R. Herath lbw b Bishoo 0 T. Kaushal not out 9 N. Pradeep c Gabriel b Bishoo 0 Extras (b4, lb5, w5, nb6) 20 TOTAL (all out, 152.3 overs) 484 Fall of wickets: 1-56 (Silva), 2-101 (Thirimanne), 3-339 (Karunaratne), 4-425 (Chandimal), 5-427 (Siriwardana), 6-448 (Mathews), 7-467 (Prasad), 8-467 (Herath), 9-475 (Perera), 10-484 (Pradeep) Bowling: Taylor 20-4-65-4, Roach 19-3-57-2, Holder 21-4-36-1, Gabriel 20-2-76-1, Samuels 27-4-84-1, Bishoo 40.3-2-143-4, Brathwaite 5-0-14-0. K. Brathwaite lbw b Herath 19 S. Hope b Herath 23 D.M. Bravo not out 15 M. Samuels not out 7 Extras (nb2) 2 TOTAL (2 wkts, 21 overs) 66 Karunaratne extended his domination into day two, collecting boundaries on either side of the wicket off Taylor in the day’s fifth over to pass 150 for the second time in Tests. The left-hander was largely untroubled and looked to be marching towards a maiden double hundred when he tugged an innocuous short delivery from part-time off-spinner Samuels back to the bowler to fall three overs before lunch. Chandimal, meanwhile, played positively to reach three figures, about 40 minutes before the interval. He moved into the 80s with a boundary in separate overs off seamer Kemar Roach but was then dropped for the second time in his innings on 82 when Jermaine Blackwood failed to hold on to a chance at point off speedster Shannon Gabriel in the first over of the bowler’s first spell of the morning. Unfazed by the let-off, Chandimal whipped Bishoo to the mid-wicket boundary before punching Gabriel over mid-off for another four to record his second straight century in Galle. SCOREBOARD Rocking on 49 for two, the Windies were steadied by left-hander Darren Bravo, unbeaten on 15, and Marlon Samuels, on seven not out, who safely navigated their way to the close. Heading into a pivotal third day, West Indies are still adrift by 418 runs with eight wickets intact. Earlier, big centuries from Karunaratne (181) and Chandimal (151) laid the foundation for Sri Lanka’s dominance after the hosts resumed the day on 250 for two. The pair extended their overnight third-wicket stand of 149 to 238 before being separated, as Sri Lanka controlled the morning session to add 94 runs for the loss of just one wicket. The left-handed Karunaratne, unbeaten on 135 overnight, posted a career-best knock, facing 354 balls in a shade over eight hours at the crease, and striking 16 fours and a six. Chandimal, meanwhile, who was 72 not out at the start, completed his fifth Test century with an innings which included 16 fours and two sixes and lasted 298 balls and six and a half hours. Captain Angelo Mathews chipped in with a breezy 48 off 65 deliveries, adding a further 86 for the fourth wicket with Chandimal. Once Karunaratne fell before lunch, however, Sri Lanka declined to lose their last eight wickets for 145 runs. Leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo finished with four for 143 from a marathon 40 overs, while fast bowler Jerome Taylor picked up two for 65.center_img Almost a double century GALLE, Sri Lanka (CMC): West Indies lost both their openers cheaply in the final hour to suffer a major setback after big centuries by Dimuth Karunaratne and Dinesh Chandimal had given Sri Lanka command of the opening Test here yesterday. Facing a massive challenge after Sri Lanka piled up a massive 484 in their first innings, West Indies were further undermined by the quick departures of Kraigg Brathwaite (19) and Shai Hope (23) to the left-arm spin of Ragana Herath to close the second day at the Galle International Stadium tentatively placed on 66 for two. The pair added 33 for the first wicket before Brathwaite missed an arm ball, was struck on the back leg and adjudged leg before wicket after just over 36 minutes at the crease. He had earlier had a similar decision overturned on review, on 14. Hope, in only his fourth Test, played authoritatively for just over an hour and struck three fours but perished when Herath got one to drift past his forward defensive prod, and hit off-stump, about 20 minutes before the close. WEST INDIES 1st Innings SMOOTH SAILINGlast_img read more

Captain could be in trouble

first_imgCaptain Horace Burrell has been President of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) for an accumulated 17 years. Jamaica’s football accomplishments under the captain’s stewardship have been many and varied, headlined by the historic qualification of the Reggae Boyz for the senior World Cup Finals in France, 1998. Add to that the Under-17 team qualifying in 1999 the Under-20s in 2001 the Under-17s again in 2011, and throw into the mix some six Caribbean Cup titles. By any stretch of the imagination, the captain has been the best and most successful leader of Jamaica’s football. Not only did his vision and forthright leadership change the reality of the local game, Captain’s work also changed the perception that Jamaicans had of their national football team in an unimaginable and positive way that has persisted to this day. During his tenure as JFF president, Captain Burrell has gathered vast experience in the intricate nuances of managing the affairs of the nation’s most popular sport. Add to that political savvy, garnered along the way in holding on to that coveted position for the better part of two decades. intimidating reality That is a mere fraction of the intimidating reality that must have cost Mr Orville Powell many sleepless nights, before he decided to throw his hat into the race for the top leadership position of the most high-profile job in Jamaican sport. Mr Powell deserves great kudos for, at least, conjuring the cojones to do what many before him in a sometimes fractious local football fraternity have all failed to do. Having had private conversations with key members of the local football fraternity in recent times, almost in a chorus the call is to see the Captain ousted, with the most popular cry being for a more equitable distribution of the “football spoils”. My response remained consistent throughout, get an alternative candidate, take the message to the delegates and mount the challenge. Until the recent emergence of Mr Powell, the barks have been all louder than the bites. The Montego Bay United Football Club president spoke stridently and passionately and was, for the most part, on point with the issues raised – the lack of transparency and accountability, as well as the spiraling debt of the federation. CONFLICT OF INTEREST He spared no punches in raising the longstanding issue of the perceived conflict of interest in the scenario where the company owned by the president of the federation sponsors numerous parish associations, with the votes of the representatives of those same parish associations set to decide his fate as president. These were but some of the poignant points raised by Powell, which resonates loudly with all concerned with the sport locally. The word on the ground is that Mr. Powell’s biggest challenge will be to secure, in short order, four of the 15 available votes – to get the nomination to challenge for the presidency. The talk is, if Orville Powell gets the nomination, Captain Burrell will be in trouble. There is no doubt that the Captain is a veteran and wily campaigner, who, after suffering that bitter ousting by Crentson Boxhill in 2003, will not want to experience that feeling again, and will spare no punches in protecting his turf. On the other hand, the demise of Austin ‘Jack’ Warner, Jeff Webb and the imminent fall of former FIFA boss, Joseph ‘Sepp’ Blatter, represents the loss of some big trump cards for Captain. The question is, will the wind of change sweeping across the sport internationally have enough momentum to sweep Captain out of power and sweep Orville Powell in the opposite direction, and into that now famous office that runs the nation’s most popular sport? Your guess is as good as mine. I am just about taking my seat in the stands, waiting for sound of the referee’s whistle, which should be heard loud and clear on nomination day, Thursday, November 5. Let the games begin.last_img read more

‘I gave everything’ – Bernard reflects on contribution to netball

first_img The backlash against the team from the World Cup disappointment left a bitter taste in Bernard’s mouth. “Jamaicans only respect medals, and we suffered great disrespect because we did not get a medal. They quickly forgot the (bronze) medal we won at the Commonwealth Games. But netball is something that we have to be proud of,” she insisted. She backs new president Dr Paula Daley Morris to take the association forward and would like to see her complete some of the projects like the two-year-old semi-professional league. “We had a specific plan, but the new association (leadership) will have to forge their own plans …, so it is for Paula and her team to look at it and see what they can manage. But she must be given the opportunity to lead the association in the direction she sees fit. “I would like to see it continue because semi-professional is the way to go. England, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa are not fools in doing it. We must also grow the parish associations so they can be vibrant,” she said. Bernard will continue to contribute to netball in her new capacity as treasurer of the Federation of Americas Netball Association. However, her focus will be on her family business, and she has no aspiration of making it to the top netball post (International Netball Federation president). “I want a break. For 20 years I have been in netball non-stop, and 10 years of hard labour as president, so my time has come,” she declared. The election of the new president, Daley Morris, was shrouded in controversy, with some four lawyers required to cipher the articles of the association. “The articles were done by a reputable law firm, and all the lawyers who looked at it said there was nothing to prevent a director from seeking a higher post. In the final analysis, we chose one leader and we should move on. “In the past not many people wanted to support us, but now that my board has taken it to this level several people want to serve. But it should not be that we have to go through such acrimony because it’s a voluntary service. “We want to put this election behind us and accept the decision. I want us to put aside our feelings and behave appropriately. If we can’t do that then there is going to be division. In life there is going to be differences of opinion, but I know we all want what is best for netball,” she reasoned. Bernard walks away knowing she gave her best to the sport. “I leave the sport knowing that I gave everything and more. I leave the sport knowing that I helped move it from one stage to the next. I leave the sport knowing that I did not embarrass the foremothers and that netball became a household game.” GREAT DISRESPECT UNPRECEDENTED FUNDING After 10 years at the helm, charismatic netball president Marva Bernard rode off into the sunset at the end of her tenure as Netball Jamaica’s president, convinced she had done her very best. Even though the country did not win a medal at the Netball World Cup in Australia in August, the veteran administrator is proud she left behind a lasting legacy and solid foundation on which future administrators of the sport can continue to build. Bernard spent 12 years as treasurer of the netball association before she was elected to the top post in 2005. She is responsible for taking the association from a struggling to a thriving entity, rearranging the administration’s structure so that it could run as a business. “I was able to convince the prime minister to give us a house for our national players and that is an achievement many of the presidents before me wanted. I was able to get players overseas in professional and semi-professional leagues in England and Australia. I am happy that the relationships I have made with Australia, New Zealand and England have helped us,” she said. While former presidents found it difficult to generate funds, Bernard, through persistence, was able to convince sponsors to invest in netball, which brought about unprecedented funding and greater support for programmes and players in ways never seen before. Senior team players were given a stipend each month, new programmes that made many high school girls qualified umpires or near-qualified umpires were also incorporated. “They (sponsors) are proud to be associated with netball. We have built on what others that have gone before us left behind, and we helped to make netball a household game,” she said. However, she desired nothing more than the coveted World Cup gold medal. “The biggest disappointment was not being able to win a medal at the World Cup, but that is sports, that is life. But if you go for something and you do not succeed, you try and try again,” she said. “I am proud that since the rankings was introduced in 2007, even though we have not played as many matches as the higher-ranked teams like England, we are still better than many countries in the world that have much better resources than we have,” she added.last_img read more

LIVERPOOL VS LEICESTER CITY

first_imgLIVERPOOL VS LEICESTER CITYLIVERPOOL (4-3-3)MIGNOLET, CLYNE, SKRTEL, SAKHO, MORENO, HENDERSON, LUCAS, CAN, LALLANA, FIRMINO, COUTINHOLEICESTER (4-4-2)VARDY, OKAZAKI, MAHREZ, KING, KANTE, ALBRIGHTON, DE LAET, FUCHS, MORGAN, SIMPSON, SCHMEICHELLeicester City’s remarkable success story continues amid growing belief that they could actually win the Barclays Premier League title. The 3-2 win at Everton last Saturday extended their unbeaten league run to 10 games, winning eight.The victory at Goodison Park took Leicester five points clear at the top of the Premier League. Though Arsenal reduced that lead to two points following their 2-1 win over Manchester City at the Emirates on Monday, Leicester still go into the Christmas period top of the tree.And past history suggests a happy new year lies ahead for the Foxes; of the past 23 Premier League champions, 11 were top at Christmas, while all but one – Aston Villa in 1999 – finished the season in the top four, suggesting Champions League football beckons for the King Power Stadium.Liverpool, beaten 2-0 by Watford at Vicarage Road last Sunday, have gone three league games without a win, losing two. Leicester have failed to win in their last four league visits to Anfield, drawing last season and losing the previous three. Previously, Leicester had won three in a row at Liverpool.At Goodison, Riyad Mahrez netted two penalties and now has seven goals in nine Premier League appearances in the month of December, including 2015.Liverpool are still missing Joseph Gomez, Danny Ings and Daniel Sturridge and give tests to Dejan Lovren, James Milner and Simon Mignloet, who all missed the defeat at Watford. Leicester welcome back Robert Huth after suspension and test Danny Drinkwater and Jamie Vardy.last_img read more

Napoli take first winter title since Maradona’s days

first_imgROME (AP): Napoli are halfway to their first Serie A title since Diego Maradona led the club to the 1990 championship. Gonzalo Higuain scored twice as Napoli routed promoted Frosinone 5-1 yesterday to earn the southern team the Italian league’s symbolic “winter title”. Through 19 rounds of the 38-match season, Napoli hold a two-point lead over Inter Milan, who were beaten 1-0 by Sassuolo earlier with a last-minute penalty to surrender the lead. The winter champions have gone on to win Serie A nearly seven out of every 10 seasons. “We’re still not sure what we’re capable of,” Napoli’s first-year manager Maurizio Sarri said. The last time Napoli earned the mid-term honor came in 1990. “Being winter champion means nothing. It means something when you’re champion in May,” Higuain said. “We’ve got to stay calm now because there are still five months to go and we want to continue this way.” Fiorentina are third, three points behind, after losing 3-1 to Lazio on Saturday. Also yesterday, it was: Atalanta 0, Genoa 2; Bologna 0, Chievo Verona 1; Torino 0, Empoli 1; and Hellas Verona 0, Palermo 1. In an entertaining match at the San Siro, both Inter and Sassuolo produced numerous chances and goalkeepers Samir Handanovic and Andrea Consigli were superb. Inter threatened early with Mauro Icardi and Adem Ljajic, then Simone Missiroli and Nicola Sansone were dangerous for Sassuolo. Handanovic tipped a free-kick from Sansone over the bar and Consigli made an extraordinary diving save to swat away a shot from Ljajic before the break. Inter substitute Rodrigo Palacio had a clear look in the 79th, but his effort was cleared off the line by defender Federico Peluso. Miranda’s decisive foul came after an error by fellow center back Jeison Murillo. Berardi then calmly beat Handanovic, improving to a perfect 6-for-6 on penalties this season. Having been beaten by Lazio before the holiday break, Inter has now lost two consecutive home matches in Serie A for the first time since May 2013. Sassuolo are sixth, 10 points behind Napoli.last_img read more

Miller hails T20 opportunity for emerging cricketers

first_imgCaptain Nikita Miller has described as unique the opportunity that has been provided for new and emerging players of Jamaica at the triangular Twenty20 cricket tournament involving the Windward Islands and Antigua and Barbuda. The week-long tournament, which forms part of Antigua and Barbuda’s Independence Day Celebrations, bowls off today in Antigua. “It’s an opportunity for the new and emerging players to show the national selectors what they are capable of,” said Miller, who along with teammates departed the country yesterday. He added: “I am, therefore, looking forward to them expressing themselves in the way they know how to. Some of the players who are in this team will be more than likely be in the set up for preparations for the regional Super50 tournament in January.” The team, which has a mixture of recent Jamaica and West Indies Under-19 representatives, includes two players with West Indies level experience. They are Miller and returning leg-spin all-rounder, Gavin Wallace. Set to play leading roles, the duo will also have in support promising batsman Brandon King, fast bowler Nicholson Gordon, and young Guyanese-born opener Trevon Griffith, who represents Jamaica Scorpions. REGIONAL REPRESENTATION The other members of the Junior Bennett-coached aggregation are either former national trials invitees or are new to regional representation at the Jamaica senior level. “It’s a national team and although it’s not a regional level tournament the aim is to win,” continued Miller, who captained Jamaica for the first time at the regional Super50 earlier this year. “I cannot speak for the other participating teams as I have not seen their squads but I know, for example, that Devon Thomas will be playing for Antigua. “We will therefore be going there to play the best cricket possible and hopefully it will help us to the title.” Jamaica squad – Nikita Miller – captain, Oraine Williams, Jermaine Harrison, Trevon Griffith, Kerry Holness, Brandon King, Derval Green, Romaine Morris, Oshane Thomas, Nicholson Gordon, Gavin Wallace, Pete Salmon and Fabian Allen.last_img read more