Tag: 上海同城对对碰龙凤

Adrian Peterson Vikings Lose to Carolina Panthers

Adrian Peterson added to his tough week when the Minnesota Vikings lost to the Carolina Panthers Sunday.Panthers quarterback Cam Newton threw three touchdown passes and ran for another TD as his team rolled over the mourning Peterson and the Vikings 35-10.The running back, Peterson averaged 6.2 yards per carry, and finished the game with 62 yards on 10 carries and 21 yards on three receptions. However, the Vikings (1-4) didn’t play the star after halftime.Friday, Peterson learned that his 2-year-old son died in South Dakota after suffering injuries from alleged child abuse. The man involved, Joseph Robert Patterson, was arrested and charged in the case.“It’s tough. It’s a crazy situation,” Peterson said. “Anytime you lose a child, no matter the circumstances, it hurts. I can’t describe it. But I’ve got a good supporting cast.”Said Vikings coach Leslie Frazier: “I thought he handled it as well as you can.” read more

SDGE wants ratepayers to cover fire damage costs

first_imgSDG&E wants ratepayers to cover fire damage costs November 28, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 5:40 PM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – For the past 10-years SDG&E has been fighting to have ratepayers cover 100 percent of the losses incurred from all damages caused by the 2007 fires, and the damages were substantial, about $2 billion in insurance covered about 85% of those costs, but SDG&E still wants ratepayers to cover the other 15%, $379 million.After losing in the lower courts, SDG&E has taken the case to the state supreme court. In addition, the utilities are going to the legislature to change the laws to allow for 100% of fire damages to be covered by ratepayers even if the utilities negligently cause fires. And they want ratepayers to cover all damages from future fires.KUSI’s Steve Bosh has the details center_img Steve Bosh Steve Bosh, Posted: November 28, 2018last_img read more

Google Doodle honors classroom heroes for Teacher Appreciation Week

first_img Tags Our wishlist for Google I/O 2019 3:13 Post a comment 0 Now playing: Watch this:center_img Originally published May 6, 6:03 a.m. PT.Update, at 6:32 a.m. PT: Added details about Google grants for teachers, 8:52 a.m. PT: Added more details about Rodney Robinson. Share your voice Google had almost 60,000 doodles to choose from for Teacher Appreciation Week. Google Google is celebrating teachers on Monday. If you check out the search engine’s page, you’ll see a crayon-style Google Doodle surrounded by pencils, protractors, apples, puzzle pieces and other school-related images.”Today’s Doodle was created in partnership with the 57 2019 US State Teachers of the Year who visited Google in January for their first group meeting and explores the theme ‘A day in the life of a teacher,'” Google said in a blog post.In honor of Teacher Appreciation Week, Google said it’s making one its largest teacher-focused grants — a $5 million Google.org grant that’ll unlock $10 million for teachers through DonorsChoose.org. For every dollar that’s donated to the nonprofit, Google will add 50 cents, from Monday to Tuesday, up to $1.5 million total. Rodney Robinson, 2019 National Teacher of the Year, created the doodle. Robinson said he went into teaching to honor his mother, Sylvia Robinson, who was denied the opportunity to become an educator because of poverty and segregation. Instead, his mother opened an in-home daycare center for children in the neighborhood and taught in a different way. Today, Robinson teaches social studies in a juvenile detention facility in Virginia. “I work to create a positive school culture and empower my students to become civically minded social advocates,” Robinson said.When he was chosen as Virginia’s Teacher of the Year, Robinson said he was “elated.”  “Google’s homepage today is a tribute to teachers, and I feel proud to see the contribution I made — alongside my 56 fellow State Teachers of the Year — up there for everyone to see,” Robinson said in a blog post. Teacher Appreciation Week was trending on Twitter Monday morning as thousands took to social media to celebrate educators.Even with that sort of recognition, teachers often find themselves in a tough situation, living on modest salaries while running classrooms with a lack of resources and having to purchase supplies out of pocket. Over the last year, those working conditions have led to walkouts, sickouts and strikes. Internet Culturelast_img read more

Sun Pharmas profit drops 30 over compliance costs lower sales

first_imgIndia’s largest drug-maker Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd reported a 30% slump in quarterly profit on Saturday, 7 November, as sales in most of its markets fell and costs related to fixing compliance issues continued to hurt.In the company’s largest market, the United States, Sun Pharma’s sales in the quarter ended September were down 28%, which the company attributed mainly to increasing competition and a supply crunch at its Halol manufacturing plant in India.”Halol” was a key contributor to Sun Pharma’s sales, but in September, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) outlined a number of problems with manufacturing processes, and the company has since been working on remediating those.However, its profit has been hit for a few quarters as it had to restrict supply, and has not been getting US approvals to launch any product made at the Halol plant.The company’s Managing Director Dilip Shanghvi sought to assure analysts on a conference call on Saturday evening that remediation efforts were on track, though they aren’t yet complete, so the USFDA has not been invited for a re-inspection.”We are keeping (the FDA) updated on the progress at the agreed frequency. I think the things we have promised or assured the FDA, we are addressing,” he said. The company has not received any feedback from the FDA, he added.Halol is one of several Sun Pharma plants undergoing remediation. Five of its other plants — most of which it got as part of its acquisition of Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd last year — are under an FDA import ban ever since the agency found a series of quality control issues at the plants.Shanghvi said the “full value” of the Ranbaxy deal would be realised by 2018.Apart from generics, the company is developing a drug to treat “psoriasis”, which is in Phase 3 clinical trials and expected to be filed for US approval in 2017.Sun Pharma reported a July-September net profit of Rs 1,107 crore ($167.4 million), down from Rs 1,572 crore a year earlier. Analysts, on average, were expecting Rs 1,308 crore, according to Thomson Reuters data.Total revenue was down 15% as sales across the countries it operates in fell. India was the only exception, where sales rose a marginal 1%.The company said currency volatilities and a decision to reduce its presence in some less-profitable areas hurt its sales in emerging and other markets during the quarter.last_img read more

Britains answer to King Tuts tomb found on roadside

first_imgAn undated handout picture released by the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) in London on 9 May, 2019, shows an archaeolgist excaating princely burial chamber discovered in Prittlewell, near Southend, southeast England. Photo: AFPExcited archeologists on Thursday hailed an ancient burial site found on the side of a road near a pub and a budget supermarket as Britain’s answer to the tomb of Egypt’s King Tutankhamun.The small bump on a patch of grass in the county of Essex just northeast of London did not look like much when UK researchers first spotted it in 2003.”The thing that’s so strange about it is that it was such an unpromising-looking site,” Museum of London Archaeology’s (MOLA) director of research Sophie Jackson said.But a team of 40 MOLA archeologists still decided to give it a shot.Years of meticulous digging and carbon dating have now led them to conclude that they have stumbled onto an Anglo-Saxon burial chamber of a prince whose likes have never before been found in Britain.The 1,400-year-old tomb is believed to be the oldest example of a Christian Anglo-Saxon royal burial.It includes carefully arranged gold coins and vibrantly-coloured glass and wooden drinking vessels believed to have come from what is now modern-day Syria.Some of the decorations still hang on the site’s original walls.The entire structure would have formed a 13-foot (four-metre) square and been buried five feet below ground.It includes fragments of a lyre — a type of harp popularised in European folklore — and what may be Britain’s oldest example of painted Anglo-Saxon woodwork.”I think it’s our equivalent of Tutankhamun’s tomb,” Jackson said.Tutankhamun is the formal name of the mummified pharaoh most tourists visiting Egypt’s Valley of the Kings know as King Tut.”It’s a really interesting time,” the researcher explained.”Christianity is sort of creeping (into Britain). They would have been just on the transition between having pagan burials with all your gear but also having these crosses.”- Warrior prince or king’s brother? -King Tutankhamun’s tomb is globally renowned for its phenomenally preserved golden death mask dating back more than 3,300 years.The British find is less than half as old and includes the belongings and remains of a far less distinguished man whose precise identity remains shrouded in a degree of mystery.But his 5 foot 8 inch (1.72-metre) frame was exceptionally large for its time.Some suspect that he may have been a warrior prince. Jackson said her best guess was that he was King Saebert’s brother Seaxa.Saebert died in 616 after ruling Essex for 12 years. Historians think he was the region’s first Christian king.Research and scientific dating suggest the man in the tomb probably died between 575 and 605.MOLA intends to put some of its discoveries on display at a local museum this week.It is especially proud of the lyre.”This is the first time the complete form of an Anglo-Saxon lyre has been recorded,” the museum said in its research notes.last_img read more

Amid Tariff Talks Houston Strengthens Partnership With Chinese City

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Houston and the Chinese city of Suzhou on Tuesday signed a memorandum of understanding to strengthen their economic partnership.Suzhou is a fast-growing major city west of Shanghai. Like Houston, it’s putting more emphasis on innovation and technology.“In particular, they worked on some biotechnology and other issues,” Houston’s chief development officer, Andy Icken, told News 88.7 after signing the MOU. “They see opportunities in the city (of Houston) for some of their companies and we’d like to help them reach out to others and meet in this sector.”It comes at a time of dueling new tariffs between the two countries, as the Trump administration aims to punish China for intellectual property theft.This week, many U.S. companies and industry groups are testifying on the tariffs at a public hearing in Washington. Share center_img Listen Florian MartinHouston Chief Development Officer Andy Icken, right, and his counterpart from Suzhou, Cai Jianfeng, sign a memorandum of understanding during the US-China Innovation and Investment Summit at the Westin Houston Memorial City on Tuesday, May 15, 2018.The trade relationship between China and the United States may be strained due to new tariffs, but Houston is going the opposite way. 00:00 /00:44last_img read more