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Hearts aching across nation

first_imgThere I sat, head in hands, all the energy and life sucked from my body. Less than one minute earlier, I had been standing, screaming my lungs out in anticipation and with an excitement never felt before.With bases loaded and two batters out, the playoff hopes and dreams of Brewers fans everywhere were hanging in the balance and all-star MVP candidate Prince Fielder at the plate. But Mighty Fielder grounded out, and the Brewers flickering hopes for the postseason more or less died. If you’re a sports fan, the ebb and flow of a game or season can build you up, giving you some of the most euphoric feelings imaginable. By the same token, it can tear you down just as quickly. Almost never was that more painfully evident than the last seven days in the world of baseball. For Brewers fans, the decisive day was last Thursday. The Cubs had just lost their second game in a row to the Marlins, sending cheers up throughout tailgates in the Miller Park parking lots. If the Brewers were to make a move in the Central division, it would be that night.In what was the biggest game of the year for the Brewers (arguably the biggest game since 1992, the last time the Crew had a shot to make the playoffs), they laid a total egg: a 9-5 loss in which the team booted and threw the ball around for five errors.As heartbreaking and depressing as the result on the field was, equally depressing were the fans in the stands — rather, the lack thereof.This was the biggest game for the franchise in the last 15 years and far fewer than the announced crowd of some 34,000 actually showed up. As a Brewer fan, I was, and am, embarrassed by that. In the middle of a pennant chase, the team should be selling out every game, no excuses.But the heartbreak wasn’t limited to the Midwest. On the east coast, the Mets undertook one of the most heartbreaking collapses in baseball history. Up 7 1/2 games with only 17 games to play, the Mets went into an all-out tailspin, losing 12 of their last 17 games, including six of the last seven.Just two nights ago, more heartbreak ensued. Up two runs in extra innings, the Padres lost the tiebreaker Wild Card game to the Rockies with the all-time saves leader on the mound. Trevor Hoffman gave up three runs in the bottom of the 13th, the last one in very controversial fashion after replays showed Matt Holliday apparently did not touch home plate with his face-first slide.On the flip side of all the heartbreak, however, is sheer joy.For diehard Cubs, Phillies and Rockies fans (can they actually exist for the Rockies if the team has been around less than 15 years?), those heartbreaking cases were nothing short of amazing.Scenes of the towel-waving masses that packed to Philadelphia’s Citizens Bank Park the brink joyously celebrating a post-season berth stood in stark contrast to the drab and downtrodden masses which filled Shea Stadium as Mets fans realized their team’s season was coming to a swift end. The carnage isn’t just limited to the diamond. On the college football scene this past weekend, top-ranked teams like Florida, Texas, Oklahoma and West Virginia all saw their national title hopes essentially go down the tubes with losses to lower-ranked teams.Fans who started the season posting on message boards about lofty expectations for their teams and quietly planning out roadtrips to the BCS National Championship Game in New Orleans are now left to the depressing realization of needing to make new arrangements to travel to a lesser bowl.Here in Wisconsin, Badger fans have been able to avoid that heartbreak so far. But somewhere in the back of everyone’s mind is the knowledge that that empty feeling in the stomach and head-in-hands moment always could be just one play around the corner. Ben is a junior majoring in journalism and political science. Feeling heartbroken after a tough loss too? Contact him at bvoelkel@badgerherald.comlast_img read more

Tyler Roberson explodes for 20 points and 16 rebounds against Elon

first_img Published on November 21, 2015 at 10:50 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Malachi Richardson’s fadeaway 3-pointer wasn’t a pass, but it served the same purpose. The looping shot fell right into the hands of Tyler Roberson camped under the basket, and he dropped it in. The ensuing two possessions also ended in the hands of Syracuse’s suddenly aggressive forward.The next play he tipped a missed shot to himself on the defensive glass. On the other end seven seconds later, he cut through defenders and dove to the floor to save an offensive rebound.The trio of plays commenced a 10-0 Syracuse run that put the Orange ahead for good.“I think I was just active and going after rebounds, playing hard,” Roberson said. “I think we need to rebound to win…I think I was putting myself in a little better position.”In Syracuse’s first game, Roberson went scoreless in just 21 minutes. Against St. Bonaventure on Tuesday, he fouled out despite grabbing 12 rebounds. But SU’s (3-0) 66-55 win over Elon (2-2) on Saturday saw Roberson piece together his most complete game of the season. He posted a career-high 20 points and added 16 rebounds, seven of which came on the offensive glass.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHe took advantage of open rebounds when his defender went to help with Syracuse attacking the basket more consistently.“People are going to be concerned about Trevor (Cooney), Mike (Gbinije) and Malachi,” SU head coach Jim Boeheim said, “and (Roberson’s) got to be able to find those spots.”Boehiem said when Roberson set screens, it forced defenders to help out, putting Roberson in the best position to score. On Saturday, Roberson connected on nine of his 15 chances and committed just two fouls in 37 minutes.He made his loudest statement of the night when he cut to the basket across the baseline with Syracuse moving in transition. He caught a quick pass from Richardson and immediately went up as he made body-to-body contact with Elon’s Jack Anton. His shot went off the glass and Anton spilled to the floor having given Roberson a chance at a 3-point play.It capped Syracuse’s first 10-0 run of the night and helped propel the Orange to a six-point halftime lead.“It was big. I just ran the floor,” Roberson said. “As soon as Malachi saw me, I finished the play.”After Syracuse defeated Lehigh in its season opener just eight days before, Boehiem’s only comment on the big man was to say that he didn’t see much. No points and five rebounds. He was an afterthought on a team that could afford it on that night, but not in the future.On Friday, he broke his ever-stoic facial expression to smile when asked why his head coach was never happy with him. He said he took it more of a challenge than as a slight. Boeheim may not have seen much from his starting forward a week ago, but he was impossible to miss against Elon.“I think he could do that every single night,” Cooney said. “I really do. And I think everyone else in this room does. When he goes out there and plays his game and dominates, you see the numbers he can put up.” Commentslast_img read more

Sommers: Who needs to step up in the Sweet 16

first_imgAt this point most of us, probably all of us, can admit that the next Nostradamus does not walk among us. Of course in reference to everyone’s brackets that have been busted by now, if somebody has picked an entirely correct bracket to this point, a line is probably filing outside his or her front door waiting to ask whether the world will truly end in 2012. And ain’t it grand?As much as we all check our brackets game by game, especially through those first two manic days of the tournament – hoping for the mythological perfect bracket – it would be pretty boring if pick-by-pick went according to plan.If someone “knew” that Norfolk State and Lehigh were going to pull upsets over number two seeds Missouri and Duke, respectively, that would really ruin the moment of 2012 being the first tournament year with two 15 seeds advancing. The unpredictability, the fickle games that lower seeds win every year is what keeps us all coming back for more.Nobody saw Kyle O’Quinn of Norfolk State or C.J. McCollum of Lehigh causing the fits they did. In fact, commentators couldn’t stop gushing over O’Quinn’s 26 points and 14 rebounds, incredulous of the fact that no one outside the Spartans offered him a scholarship.McCollum’s 30-point, 6-rebound, 6-assist outburst nearly left Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski speechless, saying, “[Lehigh] had the best player on the court tonight in McCollum. He’s been their player of the year, and he’s really one of the outstanding players in the country. You could see why tonight.”The first four-day stretch of the tournament – six, if you count the round one play-in games – all led to this, the elimination of 52 teams and an essentially new bracket. Cue the Sweet 16.And now with the field of 16 preparing for another hotly-contested four days, more than ever, teams will look to rely on the players who have gotten their respective teams this far and try to squeeze a few more ounces of talent out of their quieter players to help push them over the top, just like O’Quinn and McCollum did in their opening round.Here’s a look at half of the field.Kentucky: POY candidate Anthony Davis is the easy choice for who the Wildcats relied on most, but his biggest contributions come on the defensive end, where all of Coach Calipari’s players play well. If Kentucky wins the national championship, it will most likely come from the contributions of Marquis Teague. The freshman guard has averaged 18 points and 5.5 assists per game for Kentucky in the tournament after averaging just 9.4 points and 4.8 assists prior to the Big Dance. If he can keep up those numbers, Kentucky will be almost as impossible to stop.Wisconsin: Everybody knows the Badgers wouldn’t be anywhere near the Sweet 16 without Jordan Taylor. Then again, opponents know that too. Expect double-teams galore on the Wisconsin star from now on, after he torched Montana and Vanderbilt. With that, someone will need to execute when Taylor kicks to the open man. After the win against Vanderbilt, Wisconsin will continue to rely on steady contributions between Mike Bruesewitz and Ben Brust. In the two games prior to the tournament, neither scored a single point but after two games in the tournament have registered 32 points. This production from the role players must continue if Wisconsin hopes to continue dancing in Boston.Indiana: Interestingly enough, the Hoosiers will be forced to navigate the waters of the tournament without a senior leader a la Kentucky, having lost Verdell Jones III to an ACL tear in the Big Ten tournament. Likely, the responsibility will fall on the shoulders of freshman forward Cody Zeller, who led Indiana in points (15.5) and rebounds (6.5) this season. The Hoosiers really need sophomore guard Victor Oladipo to step up, especially to get past Kentucky. Oladipo has been relatively invisible his last five games (7.2 ppg) after averaging 15.6 points per game in seven previous contests.Syracuse: Not often is a reserve relied on to win games, but Syracuse’s Dion Waiters is the Orange’s best player. In his last five games, Waiters is averaging 17.8 points per game off the bench. Kris Joseph and Scoop Jardine get a lot of the fanfare as seniors, but forward C.J. Fair will need to contribute inside, especially with the loss of Fab Melo.Michigan State: Is there any need to say more than Draymond Green? The guy has breathed life into MSU all season, working in wondrous ways. Need proof? Check out his triple-double against LIU-Brooklyn. As far as finding a Robin to Green’s Batman, the Spartans have an array of talent waiting to be utilized, and junior forward Derrick Nix is the beast to get it done. Listed at 6-foot-9, 270 pounds, Nix is a load on the block that many teams can’t match up against. Averaging 14 points per game in the tournament, Nix allows Green to play the perimeter when needed to stretch the defense.North Carolina: Harrison Barnes just became the de-facto man for the Heels with Kendall Marshall breaking his wrist, as sophomore guard Reggie Bullock must step up in the absence of the injured UNC point guard. He’s only scoring 8.7 per game, but with Marshall’s absence, Bullock must score in double digits if UNC hopes to reach the Final Four.Marquette: Jae Crowder, Big East Player of the Year, somehow still manages to fly under the radar and is killing teams every game. Averaging a ridiculous 21 points and 14.5 boards in the tourney, if someone doesn’t find a way to slow him down, Marquette could win it all. Darius Johnson-Odom is already a star, so some offense from Madison-product Vander Blue would be nice. Blue has only scored 12 points in the tourney, and any significant contributions from him would really hinder opposing defenses’ ability to focus on Crowder or DJO.Ohio State: The casual fan would expect Jared Sullinger or William Buford to be the names of the man who has taken the Buckeyes to this point, but it’s not. Sophomore forward Deshaun Thomas is in beast mode right now and shows no signs of stopping. The perfect complement to Thomas has been all-world defensive point guard Aaron Craft, but lately Craft has found his offensive rhthym. Against Gonzaga, Craft scored 17 points, doubled his average and dished out 10 dimes. When Kraft is on his offensive grind, it’s hard to imagine OSU losing.Brett is a senior majoring in journalism. If you had a clean slate on your bracket, who out of the Sweet 16 would you pick to reach the Final Four, or win the NCAA Championship? Let Brett know by tweeting him at @BAsportswriter or email him at bsommers@badgerherald.com.last_img read more