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‘Chelsea must really regret selling Lukaku!’ – Everton fans laud match-winning striker after West Brom turnaround

first_img Romelu Lukaku At his best he’s unstoppable – and Monday night was one of those occasions.Romelu Lukaku turned on the style as Everton forged an unlikely comeback to beat West Brom 3-2 after falling two goals behind just after half time.Lukaku, often an enigma, scored twice and set up Arouna Kone for the other in a barnstorming second half as the Toffees continued their impressive start to the season.And the words on my fans’ lips in the aftermath was just why struggling Chelsea let Lukaku escape through their clutches.Some of the best reactions to the Belgian’s imperious display can be found below: //storify.com/talksport/everton-fans-laud-romelu-lukaku-after-match-winnin.js?border=false[View the story “Everton fans laud Romelu Lukaku after match-winning display” on Storify]center_img 1last_img read more

South Africa improves access to services

first_img30 October 2012 The proportion of South Africans with access to electricity, piped water and sanitation increased considerably over the past decade, according to the country’s latest national census. Statistics South Africa released the results of census 2011, the country’s third population count since democratic elections were first held in 1994, in Pretoria on Tuesday. The previous census took place in 2001.Access to electricity According to the census, conducted in October 2011, 84.7% of South African households use electricity for lighting (up from 70.2% in 2001), 73.9% use electricity for cooking (up from 52.2%), and 58.8% use electricity for heating (up from 49.9%). The results also show a significant improvement in access to piped (tap) water in South Africa, with the number of households with no access dropping to 8.8% in 2011 from 15.6% in 2001. Nearly half, or 46.3%, of households have tap water inside their homes (up from 32.3% in 2001), according to census 2011, while 27.1% have tap water inside their yards (down from 29.0%), 11.7% have tap water on their community stand less than 200 metres from their homes (up from 10.7%), and 6.2% have to walk more than 200 metres to reach tap water on their community stand (down from 12.4%).Household sanitation Census 2011 also showed a marked improvement in household sanitation in the country, with 60.1% of households using flush toilets (toilets connected to the public sewerage system) in 2011, up from 51.9% in 2001. The use of chemical toilets (from 1.9% to 2.5%) and pit latrines with ventilation (from 5.7% to 8.8%) were slightly up, while the use of unventilated pit latrines dropped from 22.8% to 19.3%, and of bucket latrines from 4.1% to 2.1%. Municipal waste removal services also improved compared to 2001, according to census 2011, with the number of households enjoying weekly municipal removals increasing from 52.1% to 62.1%.Living standards on the up At the same time, the number of households living in formal dwellings increased, from 68.5% to 77.6%, while the number living in traditional dwellings dropped from 14.8% to 7.9% and the number living in informal dwellings dropped from 16.4% to 13.6%. Compared to 2001, census 2011 also showed big increases in household ownership of mobile phones (from 32% to 88%), television sets (from 53% to 74%), refrigerators (from 51% to 68%) and computers (from 8% to 21%). However, the surge in popularity of mobile phones and television came at the expense of radio ownership (down from 73% to 67%) and landline phone ownership (24% to 14%). SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Tlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demands

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 15 July, 2019 US representative Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) speaks during a press conference, to address remarks made by US president Donald Trump earlier in the day, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPPalestinian-American lawmaker Rashida Tlaib on Friday turned down Israel’s offer to let her visit her grandmother in the occupied West Bank, owing to restrictions she termed oppressive.It was the latest twist in a saga hinging on Israel’s war against those who would boycott it over its treatment of the Palestinians.On Thursday, Israel barred from entry the US Congress’ first Muslim women lawmakers, Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, on the grounds that they support the boycott movement, and after President Donald Trump urged the Jewish state to block the two Democrats.But it held out the carrot of allowing Tlaib to make a private visit to her elderly grandmother, if she agreed to abide by conditions including a pledge not to advocate boycotting Israel.”This could be my last opportunity to see her. I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my visit,” she intially wrote.On Friday, Israel’s Interior Minister Aryeh Deri announced that she would be permitted a “humanitarian visit”, but a few hours later Tlaib announced a change of heart. Oppressive conditions “I have decided that visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in — fighting against racism, oppression & injustice,” she wrote in a series of tweets.”When I won, it gave the Palestinian people hope that someone will finally speak the truth about the inhumane conditions,” added the 43-year-old freshman congresswoman, elected in January.”I can’t allow the State of Israel to take away that light by humiliating me & use my love for my sity to bow down to their oppressive & racist policies,” she said, referring to her grandmother.”Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. It would kill a piece of me.”On Friday, Palestinian activists had been urging Tlaib on social media not to visit her grandmother under the Israeli terms.In the family’s village of Beit Ur Al-Foqa, Muftia Tlaib had been excitedly awaiting her granddaughter’s arrival.She intended to slaughter a sheep in her honour, in accordance with custom.”I see her coming to the village in traditional (Palestinian) dress,” she told AFP on Thursday, before the latest development.Boycott movement The United States, particularly under Trump, is Israel’s strongest ally.But the two congresswomen are seen by many as enemies of Israel because of their support for the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.Israel sees the movement as a strategic threat and accuses it of anti-Semitism — a claim activists deny — and in 2017 passed a law banning entry to foreigners supporting a boycott.Israel occupied the West Bank and east Jerusalem in the 1967 Six-Day War and has for decades built settlements considered illegal under international law.Settlement growth has accelerated under Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a close Trump ally who is seeking re-election next month.More than 600,000 Israeli live in the settlements, alongside nearly three million Palestinians, in uneasy proximity throughout the West Bank and occupied east Jerusalem.Israel’s initial refusal to allow Tlaib and Omar to transit the Jewish state on their way to the West Bank sparked outrage among Palestinians and debate about the intimate ties between Netanyahu and Trump.Clash of interests Despite fierce criticism of Tlaib and BDS on the Israeli side, the country’s media largely slammed Netanyahu over the affair.The premier was accused of putting loyalty to Trump and the Republican Party ahead of Israel’s clear interest in maintaining bipartisan US support.”After countless zigzags between what is right for Israel and what is right for Trump, Netanyahu chose Trump,” analyst Shimrit Meir wrote in the top-selling Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot.The affair could cause US Democrats to rally around their two Muslim congresswomen, commentators said, in a way which could prove detrimental to Israel.Ben Caspit, a journalist with the Maariv newspaper, said Thursday’s decision to block the politicians’ entry “set new records for shortsightedness and wretchedness”.”It will turn them into martyrs, it will turn Israel into a threshold dictatorship lacking self-confidence that is closed onto itself, that bans elected American officials, critical as they may be,” he said. Tlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demands / Int’l Tlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demands / Int’lCap: In this file photo taken on 15 July, 2019 US representative Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) speaks during a press conference, to address remarks made by US president Donald Trump earlier in the day, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPTlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demandsAFP . Jerusalem Palestinian-American lawmaker Rashida Tlaib on Friday turned down Israel’s offer to let her visit her grandmother in the occupied West Bank, owing to restrictions she termed oppressive.It was the latest twist in a saga hinging on Israel’s war against those who would boycott it over its treatment of the Palestinians.On Thursday, Israel barred from entry the US Congress’ first Muslim women lawmakers, Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, on the grounds that they support the boycott movement, and after President Donald Trump urged the Jewish state to block the two Democrats.But it held out the carrot of allowing Tlaib to make a private visit to her elderly grandmother, if she agreed to abide by conditions including a pledge not to advocate boycotting Israel.”This could be my last opportunity to see her. I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my visit,” she intially wrote.On Friday, Israel’s Interior Minister Aryeh Deri announced that she would be permitted a “humanitarian visit”, but a few hours later Tlaib announced a change of heart.- Oppressive conditions -“I have decided that visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in — fighting against racism, oppression & injustice,” she wrote in a series of tweets.”When I won, it gave the Palestinian people hope that someone will finally speak the truth about the inhumane conditions,” added the 43-year-old freshman congresswoman, elected in January.”I can’t allow the State of Israel to take away that light by humiliating me & use my love for my sity to bow down to their oppressive & racist policies,” she said, referring to her grandmother.”Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. It would kill a piece of me.”On Friday, Palestinian activists had been urging Tlaib on social media not to visit her grandmother under the Israeli terms.In the family’s village of Beit Ur Al-Foqa, Muftia Tlaib had been excitedly awaiting her granddaughter’s arrival.She intended to slaughter a sheep in her honour, in accordance with custom.”I see her coming to the village in traditional (Palestinian) dress,” she told AFP on Thursday, before the latest development.- Boycott movement -The United States, particularly under Trump, is Israel’s strongest ally.But the two congresswomen are seen by many as enemies of Israel because of their support for the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.Israel sees the movement as a strategic threat and accuses it of anti-Semitism — a claim activists deny — and in 2017 passed a law banning entry to foreigners supporting a boycott.Israel occupied the West Bank and east Jerusalem in the 1967 Six-Day War and has for decades built settlements considered illegal under international law.Settlement growth has accelerated under Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a close Trump ally who is seeking re-election next month.More than 600,000 Israeli live in the settlements, alongside nearly three million Palestinians, in uneasy proximity throughout the West Bank and occupied east Jerusalem.Israel’s initial refusal to allow Tlaib and Omar to transit the Jewish state on their way to the West Bank sparked outrage among Palestinians and debate about the intimate ties between Netanyahu and Trump.- Clash of interests -Despite fierce criticism of Tlaib and BDS on the Israeli side, the country’s media largely slammed Netanyahu over the affair.The premier was accused of putting loyalty to Trump and the Republican Party ahead of Israel’s clear interest in maintaining bipartisan US support.”After countless zigzags between what is right for Israel and what is right for Trump, Netanyahu chose Trump,” analyst Shimrit Meir wrote in the top-selling Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot.The affair could cause US Democrats to rally around their two Muslim congresswomen, commentators said, in a way which could prove detrimental to Israel.Ben Caspit, a journalist with the Maariv newspaper, said Thursday’s decision to block the politicians’ entry “set new records for shortsightedness and wretchedness”.”It will turn them into martyrs, it will turn Israel into a threshold dictatorship lacking self-confidence that is closed onto itself, that bans elected American officials, critical as they may be,” he said.last_img read more