Tag: 浙江娱乐龙凤网

First Annual Wilmington Tennis Open To Be Held On August 11

first_imgWILMINGOTN, MA — The Friends of Wilmington Tennis is holding the First Annual Wilmington Tennis Open on Saturday, August 11, 2018 at the Wilmington High School courts.There will be two categories — adult doubles (high school grads & older) and junior singles (grammar school to high school seniors). Players must be able to keep score, serve, and bring a can of new hardcourt/extra duty tennis balls.Registration costs $20. All proceeds to benefit the Friends of Wilmington Tennis.Registration form can be found HERE. Email your information to friendswtennis@gmail.com.Tournament directors include Matt Hackett, Rob Mailey, and Kathleen Reynolds. Call 978-729-3600 or email friendswtennis@gmail.com with any questions.The event’s rain date is Sunday, August 12, 2018.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related2nd Annual Wilmington Tennis Open Set For August 10In “Sports”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, August 10, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”Wilmington High School To Administer PSAT Exam On Saturday, October 19In “Education”last_img read more

A better way to use atomic force microscopy to image molecules in

first_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters More information: Daniel Martin-Jimenez et al. Bond-Level Imaging of the 3D Conformation of Adsorbed Organic Molecules Using Atomic Force Microscopy with Simultaneous Tunneling Feedback, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.196101 © 2019 Science X Network It has been nearly a decade since AFM was introduced, allowing researchers to create images of single molecules and better understand how molecules are assembled. But the technique suffers from a major deficiency—it only works on nearly flat molecules. Those molecules with more complex 3-D characteristics are visualized only partially clearly. The reason is that the tip of the sensor oscillates at a fixed distance from the molecule under study. This means only the parts of the molecule closest to the sensor are clearly visualized. Logic has suggested that the way to fix this problem is to move the tip of the probe up and down along a path that mimics the topology of the molecule. But such an approach has proven to be elusive. Tracking the hills and valleys in real time and moving the tip just the right amount has, until now, been untenable.To overcome the problems inherent in tracking the contours of a molecule, the researchers turned to the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). It is also used to create images at the molecular level, but uses a different approach to do so. AFM uses forces from the surface under study to keep the sensor tip the proper distance for imaging—STM, on the other hand, uses the tunneling current that flows through the vacuum that exists between the sensor tip and the molecule under study. The researchers hit on the idea of using the tunneling current from STM to guide the tip of the AFM sensor tip—moving it up and down in lockstep with the contours of the molecule under study.The researchers report that their simple adjustment resulted in images of 3-D molecules that are as sharp for complex molecules as for those that are mostly flat. Single molecule magnet used as a scanning magnetometer A team of researchers at Justus Liebig University Giessen has found a way to dramatically improve the images of topologically complex 3-D molecules created using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the simple adjustment they made to the procedure that greatly improved the resolution of AFM.center_img Citation: A better way to use atomic force microscopy to image molecules in 3-D (2019, May 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-atomic-microscopy-image-molecules-d.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The AFM imaging of an adsorbed molecule on a substrate is usually done with the AFM tip oscillating at a constant height, where optimal imaging conditions (light blue region) are met only for the top part of the molecule. Daniel Ebeling’s group uses a constant-current mode instead, in which the AFM tip closely tracks the molecule topography, allowing a complete 3D molecular imaging. Credit: APS/Alan Stonebrakerlast_img read more