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First Aloha Class Vessel Delivered to Matson

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Cerrone Photography/Philly Shipyard U.S. carrier Matson has taken delivery of the first of two new Aloha Class containerships built at Philly Shipyard.The new vessel, named Daniel K. Inouye, was handed over to its owner on October 31. Matson said that it is the largest containership ever built in the United States so far.Weighing in at over 51,400 metric tons, the 850-foot long and 3,600 TEU capacity Daniel K. Inouye was built for Matson’s Hawaii service.“This new ship, our fifth delivered by Philly Shipyard, is the product of a great partnership with the Philly team in designing and constructing a new class of containership that will set a new standard for cargo delivery in the Hawaii trade,” said Ron Forest, President of Matson.The ship will embark on its 5,298-mile, 13-day maiden voyage to Oakland, California via the Panama Canal on November 7 before entering commercial service on November 22.After a port call at Long Beach, the new vessel will make its first call at Honolulu on the morning of November 28.last_img read more

InterAmerican Development Bank Representatives Pay Courtesy Call on Minister Symonette

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#IDBVisitsBrentSymonette, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, May 31, 2017 – Nassau – Representatives of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) paid a courtesy call on Minister of Financial Services, Trade & Industry and Immigration the Hon. Brent Symonette, May 25, 2017 at the offices of the Ministry.Pictured from left: Kendrick Anderson, Financial Trade Officer MFS; Tanya Murray, Project Manager; LaTonya Symonette-Tinker, Consultant; Sherrylee Smith, Permanent Secretary; Minister Symonette; Maria Florencia Attademo-Hirt, Country Representative/The Bahamas, Inter-American Development Bank Group; Alexandria Newbold, Project Manager BFS; and Allen S. Wright, Economist/Senior Specialist, IDB.(BIS Photo/Raymond A. Bethel, Sr.)#magneticmedianews#IDBVisitsBrentSymonettelast_img read more

Hughton Brighton were good value for win

first_imgBrighton manager Chris Hughton believes his side deserved their 1-0 win over Everton on SaturdayJurgen Locadia’s second-half goal proved to be the difference at the Amex Stadium with Brighton emerging victors and ending 2018 undefeated in their final two games following Wednesday’s 1-1 draw against Arsenal.And Hughton was pleased with the positive start his side made which he felt played a key role in their win.“We were able to take our performance against Arsenal into our game today. We started the game really well and that helped our confidence,” said Hughton on the club website.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“We were holding on a little bit at the end — they went to a 4-2-4 with real quality up front and we had to defend well — but I thought we were really good value for the win“That was a major thing [starting on the front foot]. We wanted to start well in the last couple of games but sometimes a little bit of fear against the bigger teams can set in.“Generally we start well at home and we certainly did today. That lifted the crowd and the team’s confidence. We had good enough passages in the game to warrant the win.”The Seagulls remain 13th in the Premier League on 25 points.last_img read more

Britains answer to King Tuts tomb found on roadside

first_imgAn undated handout picture released by the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) in London on 9 May, 2019, shows an archaeolgist excaating princely burial chamber discovered in Prittlewell, near Southend, southeast England. Photo: AFPExcited archeologists on Thursday hailed an ancient burial site found on the side of a road near a pub and a budget supermarket as Britain’s answer to the tomb of Egypt’s King Tutankhamun.The small bump on a patch of grass in the county of Essex just northeast of London did not look like much when UK researchers first spotted it in 2003.”The thing that’s so strange about it is that it was such an unpromising-looking site,” Museum of London Archaeology’s (MOLA) director of research Sophie Jackson said.But a team of 40 MOLA archeologists still decided to give it a shot.Years of meticulous digging and carbon dating have now led them to conclude that they have stumbled onto an Anglo-Saxon burial chamber of a prince whose likes have never before been found in Britain.The 1,400-year-old tomb is believed to be the oldest example of a Christian Anglo-Saxon royal burial.It includes carefully arranged gold coins and vibrantly-coloured glass and wooden drinking vessels believed to have come from what is now modern-day Syria.Some of the decorations still hang on the site’s original walls.The entire structure would have formed a 13-foot (four-metre) square and been buried five feet below ground.It includes fragments of a lyre — a type of harp popularised in European folklore — and what may be Britain’s oldest example of painted Anglo-Saxon woodwork.”I think it’s our equivalent of Tutankhamun’s tomb,” Jackson said.Tutankhamun is the formal name of the mummified pharaoh most tourists visiting Egypt’s Valley of the Kings know as King Tut.”It’s a really interesting time,” the researcher explained.”Christianity is sort of creeping (into Britain). They would have been just on the transition between having pagan burials with all your gear but also having these crosses.”- Warrior prince or king’s brother? -King Tutankhamun’s tomb is globally renowned for its phenomenally preserved golden death mask dating back more than 3,300 years.The British find is less than half as old and includes the belongings and remains of a far less distinguished man whose precise identity remains shrouded in a degree of mystery.But his 5 foot 8 inch (1.72-metre) frame was exceptionally large for its time.Some suspect that he may have been a warrior prince. Jackson said her best guess was that he was King Saebert’s brother Seaxa.Saebert died in 616 after ruling Essex for 12 years. Historians think he was the region’s first Christian king.Research and scientific dating suggest the man in the tomb probably died between 575 and 605.MOLA intends to put some of its discoveries on display at a local museum this week.It is especially proud of the lyre.”This is the first time the complete form of an Anglo-Saxon lyre has been recorded,” the museum said in its research notes.last_img read more

More Than 800 Refugees Receive Waivers To Come To US This Week

first_imgCHRISTINA ULSH / KERA NEWS SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORThis group of children came to Dallas as refugees. Here they are on the first day of school in 2014.Federal officials have granted waivers to 872 refugees to enter the U.S. this week. Refugee Services of Texas says Thursday is the last day they will be able to arrive through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. LISTEN: The KERA Radio storyThe refugees are not from the seven countries temporarily banned under President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.The resettlement agency says the refugees were already in transit and had been cleared before the travel ban took effect.Of the 800-plus refugees being admitted, 55 of them are arriving in Texas. They come from the countries Afghanistan, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea and Rwanda.More than 2,100 refugees had been scheduled to arrive in the U.S this week, but nearly half of them were denied resettlement.Refugee Services of Texas says Thursday is the last day refugees will arrive through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. Under Trump’s order, the program will be suspended for 120 days.Copyright 2017 KERA-FM. To see more, visit KERA-FM. Sharelast_img read more

Full Show Steel And Aluminum Tariffs And Rice University President David Leebron

first_imgOn Friday’s Houston Matters: Rural sheriffs say safety and security are among their top concerns with the planned bullet train connecting Houston and Dallas. News 88.7’s Gail Delaughter brings us the latest on the project.Then, hefty tariffs on U.S. imports of steel and aluminum are prompting a backlash from major trading partners. What could this mean for Greater Houston’s economy? Two guests join us join us to lay out the potential effects of these tariffs on the local economy: Ed Hirs is an economics lecturer at the University of Houston and Loren Steffy is columnist for EnergyVoice.com.Also this hour: Rice University President David Leebron answers your questions about his institution. Then, our non-experts discuss The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly of the week’s news. And we preview the 14th annual Houston Jewish Film Festival.WATCH: Today’s Houston Matters 360-Degree Facebook Live VideoWe offer a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps. This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Sharelast_img read more