Tag: 阿拉爱上海最新地址

LNOC Carries Ebola Fight to 7 Counties

first_imgIn an effort to wipe out the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) from Ebola hit countries, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in collaboration with the Liberia National Olympic Committee (LNOC) is launching an Ebola awareness campaign in the country, under the theme: “Do Not Stigmatize Ebola Survivors. They Are Our People, Embrace Them.”The campaign will focus on recovery in the fight against Ebola — simplify the de-stigmatization of Ebola survivors, and the LNOC is involving over 70,000 students in the leeward counties.Its president Philipbert Browne told journalists yesterday at LNOC headquarters on Randall Street, in Monrovia, seven counties will receive anti-Ebola materials, of which 80% will be for schools, and 20% for sporting associations and/or athletes.Browne said the distribution of the anti-Ebola items would begin on Monday, January 23, in Grand Cape Mount County, with the donation of 200 large anti-Ebola buckets with pumps, 40 cartons of Bleach Clora, five pieces of thermometers and dozens of detergents (soaps) and antiseptic soaps.Brown further said similar donations would be given to all the counties.Bomi County is expected to receive its supplies on January 23rd and on Tuesday, February 24th will be the turn of Margibi and Grand Bassa Counties.Distributions will continue on Wednesday, Feb. 25 February, in Bong County and Nimba County on Thursday, Feb. 26, to be climaxed the next day in Grand Gedeh County.“Before the distribution of anti-Ebola items County Superintendents and Sports Coordinators must be in attendance,” Browne said.He maintained that the continuous awareness against the Ebola virus is important and warned that “if we take our eye off the ball, case numbers will climb again.”Mr. Malcolm Joseph, LNOC’s vice president for Technical Affairs said despite the low infection rate, there is a need to sustain the effort to reach a ‘zero infection rate.’Joseph said a single case is equivalent to an outbreak and the threat it poses will not be over until the last case is identified and isolated.It may be recalled that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach and the President of Association of National Olympic Committees (ANOC) H.E Sheikh Ahmed Al-Sabah in separate remarks, expressed concern and the efforts needed to combat the virus from the affected countries.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

From pups to pythons – ISPCA Donegal centre helps over 200 animals in first year

first_imgThe ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre (ARC) is celebrating the first anniversary of the opening of the state-of-the-art-facility in Ramelton.The new centre has already cared for 233 animals since it opened on 20th June 2018.The centre is going from strength to strength, with two full time members of staff who care for and rehabilitate animals in need. ISPCA Centre Manager, Denise McCausland, said: “We’re pleased with how the first year at the centre has gone. It has been a busy twelve months caring for and rehabilitating 67 dogs and puppies, 144 cats and kittens, 6 ponies and donkeys and we have also helped various wildlife casualties including, a swan, a duck, two hedgehogs, one of which was trapped in a drain and was later released following veterinary treatment.“140 animals have already been adopted from the centre, 59 animals are getting ready to start their new lives and we have more animals in our care undergoing treatment and rehabilitation including an orphaned baby hedgehog (hoglet) and starling which are currently being hand reared.”October 2018: Hans the Hedgehog recovers after his rescue from a drain at the ISPCA Donegal ARCPhoto: ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation CentreISPCA Senior Inspector Kevin McGinley said: “The ISPCA Donegal ARC is the first animal rehabilitation centre of its kind in Donegal and has already helped so many animals. The majority of the animals I have rescued were victims of neglect and abuse and many others were injured and in need of veterinary care.  Once they are brought into the centre they are cared for, rehabilitated and then responsibly rehomed.”ISPCA Senior Inspector Kevin McGinleyKevin added: “No two days are the same in my job.  I could be responding to a horrific case of animal neglect and later be assisting the local Gardaí and wildlife rangers to locate a royal python on the loose, which happened recently. We are receiving a lot of calls about cats and kittens and our cattery is full to capacity.  We are treating a lot of sick and unwanted kittens which could have been prevented if owners had neutered or spayed their cats. “In most cases, spaying and neutering has overwhelmingly positive health benefits and it also prevents accidental litters of kittens or puppies which can also be challenging in finding good homes. Pet owners need to play their part by spaying and neutering their pets and this will massively help in preventing unwanted litters in the first place. We are asking to public to ask their vets for advice and do the right thing for their pets”.ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre Manager Denise McCauslandDenise said:  “The Donegal ARC is going from strength to strength and this has only been made possible with the kind help of our local supporters who have made donations, fostered an animal or volunteered their time. It costs over €100,000 annually to run the centre, including two full time members of staff who care for and rehabilitate the animals in our care. These costs don’t include the local ISPCA Inspector.  Donations, no matter how big or small, are really appreciated so we can continue our work – donations can be made online https://www.ispca.ie/donate/ ”.The ISPCA is always looking for volunteers who can help out. The ISPCA has a number of volunteer roles available to work hands-on with the animals in our cattery, kennels and stables. They are also looking for grounds keeping and maintenance volunteers, and people to help out at various events, or to do some fundraising!To become an ISPCA volunteer, you must be over 16 years of age for insurance purposes. Visit the website for more information about volunteer opportunities here https://www.ispca.ie/volunteer/The ISPCA is asking the public to continue to report animal cruelty to the ISPCA National Animal Cruelty Helpline in confidence on 1890 515 515, email helpline@ispca.ie or report online herehttps://www.ispca.ie/cruelty_complaint From pups to pythons – ISPCA Donegal centre helps over 200 animals in first year was last modified: June 20th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre (ARC)ISPCAlast_img read more

Io, Io, It’s Off to Work We Go

first_imgThe innermost large moon of Jupiter, Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system.  About the size of our moon but no more than a speck of light in small telescopes, it caused a sensation when Galileo first glimpsed it and the other three major satellites of Jupiter in 1610.  Back then, it upset tradition about the hierarchy of the heavens; today, it is upsetting tradition about the age and composition of planetary bodies.  The volcanos were first observed by the Voyagers in 1979, and have been monitored with earth instruments since then, but were most clearly and dramatically revealed by the Galileo spacecraft between 1995 and 2003.  Now that its seven-year orbital tour of the Jupiter system is history, planetary scientists are trying to come to grips with the startling findings from all four large moons.  The May issue of Icarus is devoted to the puzzles of Io, whose volcanos dwarf those on earth.  “Io After Galileo” provides a status report, a state of the moon address, before it’s off to work they go for more data mining and problem solving.    Most of the articles are descriptive of the dramatic and colorful volcanos seen in the photographic images: Tupan Patera, a lava lake 47 miles across and half a mile deep; Tvashtar Catena, a chain of craters that displayed a 240-mile-high plume and 30-mile-long fire fountain; Thor, an eruption that reached 310 miles high; Amirami, the largest lava flow in the solar system; mountains towering up to 36,000 feet (Everest is 29,000); and much more.  The fact that such activity could exist on a small moon that should be mostly frozen by now is calling into question traditional theories about the dynamics of planetary interiors.  Io’s lavas, for instance, are generally much hotter than the basaltic lavas on earth.  It appears they contain heavy elements like iron and magnesium (called ultramafic lavas).  Theory demands that the heavy elements sink into the interior; how can these heavy elements erupt out onto the surface?  What drives the incessant heat flow that is as active at the poles as at the equator, and shows no cooling down during the night?    The first-order explanation is that Io is tidally pumped by its orbital resonance between Jupiter and Europa.  Like a rubber ball repeatedly squeezed, Io’s tides generate heat and that heat has to come out.  Volcanic activity was actually predicted on this principle shortly before Voyager 1 arrived.  The problem is that there is more heat flow – by an order of magnitude – than most models of tidal flexing predict.  Veeder, Matson, Johnson, Davies and Blaney1 have made the problem worse in their paper by recalculating the heat flow from thermal anomalies and adding in the extra amount detected from polar sources, arriving at a weighted average of 2.5 watts per square meter – “well above that predicted by most theories of tidal dissipation in Jupiter and Io.”  Considering all the heat emitted by cooling lavas over the entire surface, Matson in an earlier paper had set an upper bound of 13.5 watts per square meter.  This is nearly five times the heat coming out of Yellowstone’s thermal basins.    The final paper by Keszthelyi, Jaeger, Turtle, Milazzo and Radebaugh2 is entitled “A post-Galileo view of Io’s interior.”  In proposing their “mushy magma ocean” model, in which the interior has no solid core but is mushy all way through, they seem to be meekly standing up with bulls-eyes painted on their backs, waiting for the inevitable criticisms: how can the tall mountains exist?  How does the model prevent runaway melting?  How do you stop the magma from escaping too fast?  How do you prevent differentiation?  More complex models will be required, they meekly admit, and “Such future work may show that the mushy magma ocean model will need to be further refined, or even rejected.”  They point to previous critiques: “ Stevenson (2002) predicts that a mush zone >20 km deep would be unstable over geologic timescales.  Another issue is that, if the temperature of the mantle were to change significantly on a time scale of less than 106 [one million] years, then our model for stresses in the lithosphere would be inaccurate (McKinnon et al., 2001).”  Hey, it’s only a model, a “useful starting point for future discussions.”  So Io, it’s off to work we go.1Glenn J. Veeder, Dennis L. Matson, Torrence V. Johnson, Ashley G. Davies and Diana L. Blaney, “The polar contribution to the heat flow of Io,” Icarus Volume 169, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 264-270, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.11.016.2Laszlo Keszthelyi, Windy L. Jaeger, Elizabeth P. Turtle, Moses Milazzo and Jani Radebaugh, “A post-Galileo view of Io’s interior,” Icarus Volume 169, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 271-286; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.01.005.One model they never seem to consider is that Io might not be as old as they assume.  Did you catch the phrase “geologic timescales”?  That’s code for 4.6 billion years.  If the model does not fit “geologic timescales” then the model must be tweaked till it does.  4.6 billion years is the golden parameter, the figure that must not be altered, because Darwinian evolution depends on it.    Io might be considered just a special case if it were alone in displaying recent surface activity.  Actually, most of the moons in the solar system possess young-looking features that defy long ages.  Europa may be gushing out water even today, Ganymede indicates recent cryovolcanism against expectations and has a global magnetic field, and Callisto shows signs of erosion and has an induced magnetic field.  Tidal flexing is not available to explain these features.  Same at Saturn: Enceladus shows widespread resurfacing and may have active water volcanos, Dione and Rhea show vast fields of surface frost, Iapetus is half-coated in dark material, and Titan has an atmosphere that is quickly eroding.  At Uranus, Ariel and Titania show resurfacing and Miranda is a mosaic of old-looking and young-looking features.  Even as far out as Neptune, the coldest body in the solar system – Triton, at 300 below zero – has active nitrogen geysers and few craters, looking like much of its surface has been reworked recently.  Back at home, our own moon exhibits transient lunar phenomena, short-lived bright or gaseous emissions from an interior that should long ago have solidified if as old as claimed.  Io is forcing planetary geologists to question their assumptions.  Would that one of them would break rank and question the assumption of 4.6 billion years.  But that would be aiding and abetting the enemy, the young-earth creationists.  No respectable scientist would want to be caught dead in such a trespass, or risk offending the Darwin Party.    Check out this issue of Icarus.  Look at the pictures and read the descriptions with a mind freed of evolutionary presuppositions.  Where does the evidence lead?(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Using Total Effective Length in Duct Design

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESThe Fundamentals of Rigid Duct DesignThe Two Main Reasons Your Ducts Don’t Move Enough AirAll About Furnaces and Duct SystemsSaving Energy With Manual J and Manual DKeeping Ducts IndoorsReturn-Air ProblemsSealing DuctsDuct Leakage Testing Today I’m going to explain an important concept in one of the most popular ways of doing duct design. I’ve been writing a series on duct design over at my blog and began with a look at the basic physics of air moving through ducts. The short version is that friction and turbulence in ducts results in pressure drops. Then in part 2 I covered available static pressure. The blower gives us a pressure rise. The duct system is a series of pressure drops.We can divide the pressure drops into two categories: those resulting from the ducts and fittings and those resulting from all of the components that aren’t ducts and fittings (e.g., registers, grilles, filters…). When we subtract the non-duct/fitting pressure drops from the rated pressure rise (total external static pressure) of the blower, we get the available static pressure. That’s the total pressure drop we have available for the ducts and fittings and is what sets our duct pressure budget.What we want to get out of this in the end is the proper duct and fitting sizes. We have a certain amount of available static pressure to use up. If our ducts are too small, we can end up with either too little air flow in the case of a fixed-speed blower (PSC, which stands for permanent split capacitor), or we get the air flow but use too much energy with a variable-speed blower (ECM, which stands for electronically-commutated motor). The first step in finding the proper duct and fitting sizes is to find the total effective length (often called equivalent length), the topic of today’s article. What is effective length?Length is length, right? Why do we need something else called effective length? The answer lies in fittings, those duct components that allow you to take air out of a trunkline, split a single duct into two runs, turn the air, and more.For straight duct sections, pressure drop depends only on the length. Well, that’s the idea anyway. If we use flex duct and don’t pull it tight, the pressure drop will be greater than if it were pulled tight. Texas A&M did a study on the effect of flex duct not pulled tight and the results are astounding. In my article on this research, I showed from their results that a 6″ duct moving 110 cfm when pulled tight will move only about 70 cfm with 4% linear (longitudinal) compression and about 40 cfm or less at 15% compression. (I’ll write more about the effect of different duct types in the HVAC design process later in this series.)For our purposes here, I’m going to assume that the ducts we’re using are either rigid metal or flex pulled tight. ASHRAE now has a duct calculator with options for 4%, 15%, and 30% longitudinal compression, but that’s not for use in designing duct systems. It’s to show how bad existing systems are if the flex isn’t pulled tight or to scare installers into pulling it tight.So, we’ve got straight sections of duct with their pressure drops depending on the actual length. And then we’ve got fittings. Each fitting — whether it’s splitting the air flow, reducing the duct size, or turning the air — will cause a pressure drop. In the duct design process, however, it’s more convenient to categorize these pressure drops by the length of straight duct run that would create the same pressure drop. And that, my friend, is the definition of equivalent length.But wait, you say! You were talking about effective length and now you’re talking about equivalent length. What’s going on here? ACCA’s Manual D uses both terms, although without clearly distinguishing them. From the context, though, here’s what I’ve surmised: The effective length is the combination of actual lengths of straight duct and equivalent lengths of fittings. Most people use the term equivalent length for both, though.Adding up all the lengths and equivalent lengthsBefore sizing a duct system, we have to lay out all the ducts. Below you can see an example of one we did recently. It shows the duct layout with all vents, fittings, air flows, and duct sizes. To find those duct sizes, the software we use (RightSuite Universal) calculates the effective length of the most restrictive run. From the return grille to the supply register in that run, it adds the lengths of the straight runs and the equivalent lengths of all the fittings.Each fitting we choose has an effect on the pressure drop and total effective length (TEL). We can look them up in tables, like the one below showing equivalent lengths for various elbows.The main variables we have to work with for this fitting type are:Radius of the turn (R)Diameter of the duct (D)Number of piecesRound or ovalWhen we choose fittings, we pick them based on what’s commonly available at HVAC supply houses. We also go a little conservative here because we’re doing third party HVAC design and don’t have control over the installation. For example, most of the elbows used in actual duct systems have 4 or 5 pieces. We often choose a 3 piece elbow in our design, though, because it gives us a little slack in the design. If the installer uses the 4 or 5 piece elbow instead, with 5 feet less equivalent length, the actual duct system will be less restrictive than the designed duct system, at least in that part.The total effective length (TEL) is the sum of all those fitting equivalent lengths plus the lengths of straight duct. If you’re doing it by hand, you have to go through the process for every single duct run. Then you choose the one that has the greatest total effective length. You do NOT use the sum of all the ducts and fittings.The last image below is a screenshot from RightSuite Universal showing the total effective length in one of our designs. The lengths of straight sections of duct add up to 36 feet for the supply side and 13 feet for the return side. The fittings add up to 290 feet and 85 feet respectively. This is typical. Fittings dominate when it comes to using up the available static pressure, so you have to choose them carefully. Just take a look at that table of elbows above. If you choose well, you can be at 10 or 20 feet of equivalent length. If you choose that smooth mitered elbow, however, you end up with 75 feet.The next stepOnce you lay out your ducts and choose your fittings, you have a total effective length. But here’s a little caveat: Those equivalent lengths for fittings depend on the velocity of the air, too, and it’s not a linear relationship. There are corrections for that effect, which, as far as I know, aren’t currently built into the software.To summarize:The blower creates a pressure rise to move air through the ducts.It’s rated for a certain amount of air flow at a specific total external static pressure.The ducts, fittings, and other components cause pressure drops.Subtracting the pressure drops for all the things that aren’t ducts or fittings from the total external static pressure yields the available static pressure.The available static pressure is the pressure drop budget you have to work with when designing the ducts.Each fitting has an equivalent length that equates its pressure drop to an equivalent amount of straight duct.When you add up the equivalent lengths of all the fittings and then add that number to the length of the straight sections in the most restrictive runs in the return and supply ducts, you find the total effective length (TEL).The next step in designing a duct system would be to take your available static pressure and figure out what friction rate you have to work with in sizing the ducts. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

You Can’t Win If You’ve Already Lost in Your Mind

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now You can’t win if you have already lost in your mind. Nothing has a greater impact on your results than what you believe. Your results are a reflection of your beliefs.Holding the belief that your competitors are stronger than you will cause you to lose to those competitors. But not because your competitors are stronger than you are. You’ll lose because you don’t believe that you can win, that you deserve to win. And your dream clients will be right to choose your competitors. This contest was lost before it started.Holding the belief that your clients want the lowest price will ensure that your clients buy from a competitor with a lower price. Not because your prospective clients really want the lowest price (they don’t). You’ll lose because you don’t believe that you are worth paying more to obtain. And all things being equal, your clients will be right to choose the lowest price. You didn’t believe enough to make things unequal.Believing that your company is wrong, that “they” are to blame for the difficulty you have selling, that they aren’t trying to produce good results for their clients, or that their motives are suspect, is the fast track to failure. If you don’t believe in your company, I promise you can’t sell it. First, you won’t create many opportunities because you’ll pull your punches. Second, your beliefs will betray you. You will lose opportunities because you don’t believe your company deserves them. That loss happens in your head long before your prospective client informs you that they’ve chosen your competitor.Your company has big, strong competitors? Believe you can slay giants.Your competitors sell price? Believe your clients want to pay more for more value—and then create and deliver that value.Your company has problems? Yeah? Like every other company. Believe—and help make a difference by helping make improvements (or else you are part of the problem).You are what you believe. And your results a reflection of what you believe. If you believe you have already lost, you lose before there is ever a contest. Believe otherwise.QuestionsDo you have any beliefs that don’t really serve you? Do you have beliefs that cause doubt?What do you believe that causes you to first lose in your mind? Well, not you, but someone you know well.Why do your beliefs cause you to lose opportunities?How do your beliefs cause you to lose opportunities?last_img read more

1300 athletes expected to arrive at CWG Village today

first_imgInternational Athletes and officials will continue to check in at the Commonwealth Games Village here with over 1300 more expected to arrive today for the October 3-14 event.The largest contingents to arrive today will be from Malaysia and Ghana with participants from sporting disciplines like cycling, aquatics, para-sports, shooting, boxing and athletics.The Cyprus team consists of participants from boxing, table tennis, weightlifting, archery, swimming and wrestling, the Organising Committee said in a statement.Among the other major teams arriving today are those of Canada, Scotland, Barbados, Lesotho, Jamaica and Australia.Apart from these, officials and athletes from Mauritius, England, New Zealand, Sierra Leone, Bahamas, Jamaica, South Africa, Wales, Northern Ireland, Lesotho, Falkland Islands, Guernsey, Zambia, and Cayman Islands are also arriving today.The squash and athletics teams from Australia and the badminton, netball teams from Jamaica will also join their counterparts from other countries at the Village.The Chefs-de-Mission of Bangladesh, Montserrat and Dominica will arrive along with an international media contingent.last_img read more