Tag: 雅泰spa特殊

Recycled Christmas Trees

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Extension specialists have several suggestions for creatively recycling this year’s tree.“Sunk into private fishing ponds or lakes, Christmas trees make excellent refuge and feeding areas for fish,” said UGA Extension DeKalb County agent Gary Peiffer. Extension wildlife specialists suggest anchoring the tree in a large coffee can with concrete first. The concrete weights the tree down so it stands upright. This natural fish attractor will draw bream and bass and offer a safe haven for young fish. For safety’s sake, drop the tree well away from swimming areas.Wildlife lovers can also turn their holiday tree into a winter bird feeder and shelter. “Just add some orange slices, bread and suet to attract birds and brighten up your winter landscape,” Peiffer said.A decomposing Christmas tree can also provide valuable food for insects and worms, as well as a good hiding place for birds and other creatures. If you love wildlife more than a perfectly manicured landscape, use the holiday tree to create an untidy thicket habitat for little birds, like cardinals and white-throated sparrows.Crafty types can clip away branch tips and needles to provide aroma for sachets and potpourri.UGA Extension horticulturist Matthew Chappell has several suggestions for how to recycle Christmas trees. His list includes the following:Whittle a walking stick. “It takes a lot of whittling. You can give it as a gift next Christmas.” This is Chappell’s favorite use.Create a coat rack. Cut all the branches off except for a few at the top, those should be trimmed 3 inches to 4 inches from the trunk. Build a bottle tree. Cut all the branches about a foot from the trunk and put empty wine bottles on them. “My friend in Charleston, S.C., started that trend in his yard at Folly Beach,” he said. “It’s definitely better with different colored bottles.”Craft a longbow. “My brother-in-law made a longbow out of last year’s Christmas tree. A lot of bow hunters are going back to the old style, the old world way of hunting,” Chappell said.Shape a vine pole. Trim the branches off, but leave some for vine support. Sink the trunk in the ground and use it as a trellis for a climbing plant like a morning glory or clematis.Create kindling. Chop up the smaller branches and make kindling for winter fires. You took time to select and decorate the perfect Christmas tree for the holidays. Now put a little forethought and time into recycling it. Christmas tree branches and the trunk can also be chipped and turned into valuable mulch for landscape and garden plants. If you don’t have a chipper, take your tree to the local “Bring One For The Chipper” event. To find a location, see the Keep Georgia Beautiful Foundation website at keepgeorgiabeautiful.org/bring_one_for_chipper.asp.last_img read more

On the blogs: billionaire Houston oilman is the winner in Canada’s rescue of Trans Mountain pipeline project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Sightlines Institute:In his continuing bid to earn his country the title of most corrupt petro-state, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau just committed his government—or, rather, all of the country’s citizens—to a Can$4.5 billion bailout for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.Trudeau’s government has agreed to buy the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline, along with associated assets, from the current owner, a subsidiary of Houston-based Kinder Morgan, Inc. And despite fierce opposition from the provincial government of British Columbia, First Nations groups, local municipalities, environmental activists, government watchdogs, and any sensible person concerned about the integrity of the Salish Sea, Trudeau plans to move forward with building a second pipeline that would nearly triple flows of heavy tar sands oil to the BC coast.The big winner in all this is Houston’s richest billionaire, Richard Kinder—the executive chairman of Kinder Morgan, a multinational pipeline giant that rose from the ashes of Enron and succeeded in playing the Canadian government like a fiddle throughout the years-long Trans Mountain saga.Canadian government bails out Houston billionaire On the blogs: billionaire Houston oilman is the winner in Canada’s rescue of Trans Mountain pipeline projectlast_img read more

Syracuse women’s basketball opponent preview: What to know about Connecticut

first_imgNo. 8 seed Syracuse (22-10, 11-5 Atlantic Coast) is set to take on No. 1 seed Connecticut (33-0, 16-0 American Athletic) at 6:30 p.m. on Monday in Storrs, Connecticut. SU is coming off an 85-65 first-round win over No. 9 seed Iowa State, a game in which three Orange scorers tallied over 20 points, including a career-high 24 from freshman 3-point specialist Gabby Cooper. UConn enters the contest fresh off a commanding 116-55 win over No. 16 seed Albany in its first round matchup, the 17th time this season that the Huskies have scored at least 90 points.Here’s what to know about UConn ahead of Monday’s matchup.All-time series: Connecticut leads, 38-12Last time they played: The Huskies smashed SU, 82-51, in the 2016 NCAA national championship game in Indianapolis. Breanna Stewart led the charge for UConn, posting 24 points in the program’s record fourth-straight national title win. Cornelia Fondren had 16 points for the Orange on 60 percent shooting, but SU shot just 10.5 percent from 3 in the defeat.The UConn report: The Huskies are the undisputed best women’s team in the nation, and have beaten 10 ranked team this season. Their closest game of the year was against then-No. 4 Maryland, winning by only six over the Terrapins. UConn has scored over 100 points an NCAA-leading five times this season, and has four players averaging double-digit points, with two averaging over 20.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textKatie Lou Samuelson is the Huskies’ star, averaging 20.8 points per game over an average of 31.3 minutes per game. She’s made 112 3-pointers on 259 attempts, good for 43.2 percent. The Huskies have the No. 3 scoring offense in the country, averaging 87.5 points per game, and the No. 6 scoring defense in the country, allowing an average of just 53.8 points per game.FiveThirtyEight.com currently gives the Huskies a 49 percent chance to win the tournament, and a 98 percent chance to beat the Orange on Monday.How SU beats UConn: After UConn’s opening round game against No. 16 Albany, Huskies head coach Geno Auriemma said that before every game, he asks his assistant coaches what his team would have to do to lose. Against the Great Danes, the coaching staff said that the team would have to miss “a lot” of shots. But against No. 8 SU on Monday, a team that was arguably underseeded and last met the Huskies in the national championship game, UConn doesn’t have as much room for failure as it did against Albany.For the Orange to win, it will have to put together a perfect game in all facets. Brittney Sykes and Alexis Peterson will need to match or exceed their combined scoring average of nearly 43, and Gabby Cooper will have to step up from behind the arc like she did against Iowa State. The only way to beat a powerful offense like UConn is to match it shot for shot. So Sykes, Peterson and Cooper will all probably have to finish the game with over 20 points for the second straight game.Defensively, SU needs to focus on shutting down Samuelson. The sophomore sharpshooter ranks fourth in 3-pointers made and 12th in 3-point shooting percentage in the nation. She also averages 3.39 3-pointers per game, and the Orange zone can’t let her get hot from beyond the arc.The Huskies aren’t used to playing in close games, so if the Orange can keep Monday’s game within ten points, it has potential to pull the upset. Samuelson is the only UConn player that averages more than 31 minutes per game. A tightly contested game could potentially tire out a UConn side that isn’t used to running for 40 minutes straight, and give a well-conditioned SU team the upper hand.Stat to know: 108 —  The Huskies have won 108 straight games, the all-time mark in the NCAA. Nov. 17, 2014, was the last time UConn lost, dropping an 88-86 overtime game at Stanford. UConn has not been ranked lower than No. 3 during the streak and boasts a dominant 155-1 record over its past 156 games.Player to watch: Katie Lou Samuelson, Guard, No. 33Samueslon is UConn’s replacement for Stewart, who graduated last year and now plays for the Seattle Storm of the WNBA, and she’s all but filled the role perfectly for the Huskies this season. She’s shooting 49.3 percent from the field, and her 20.8 points per game ranks No. 1 for the Huskies. Samuelson is also one of four finalists for the Naismith Trophy, which is awarded annually to college basketball’s player of the year. Napheesa Collier, a forward for the Huskies, was named a finalist as well. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 19, 2017 at 3:29 pm Contact Matt: mjfel100@syr.edulast_img read more