Tag: 上海东泰大厦

Tottenham v Apoel: Spurs duo get chance to impress, youngsters on bench

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesGeorges-Kévin N’Koudou and Juan Foyth both get chances to impress for Tottenham in tonight’s Champions League game at Wembley.Spurs, already through to the knockout phase, make a number of changes, resting the likes of Harry Kane, Christian Eriksen, Eric Dier and keeper Hugo Lloris.Dele Alli does play, as does Danny Rose, while youngsters Luke Amos and Kaziah Sterling are among the substitutes.Tottenham: Vorm, Aurier, Sanchez, Foyth, Rose, Winks, Sissoko, Alli, Nkoudou, Son, Llorente.Subs: Gazzaniga, Davies, Vertonghen, Amos, Dembele, Sterling, Walker-Peters. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

How Intricate Patterns Grow in Flowers, Feathers

first_imgHow does a growing flower bud or feather follicle know where to put the intricate colors and patterns on a mature flower or feather?  Scientists are beginning to get partial answers.Flower art:  Imagine you’re a flower bud.  You are blind, deaf, and dumb, but somehow you know how to create beautiful artwork.  Through your efforts, a lovely rose, petunia or orchid will result.  How would you do it?  An article on Live Science suggests an amazing, though partial, answer: the bud has a map of the finished product.  “The shape of a flower’s petals and leaves are dictated by a biological map hidden inside the flower’s growing bud,” according to a new study from the John Innes Centre and the University of East Anglia, both in the UK.They discovered that concealed maps within the flower buds are made up of patterns of arrows that act as instructions for how each cell in the bud should grow. As such, the maps essentially influence a flower bud’s cell polarity, or the functions of the cells.The study’s findings not only shed light on why geranium petals are unlike rose petals, they also explain why an individual flower’s petals and leaves are different shapes.The “arrows” are made up of proteins called PIN proteins that migrate to the tips of cells.  When they concentrate, a pointed leaf results.  When they fan out, a rounded shape, like a flower petal results.  Other proteins follow the “arrows” to cause growth in those areas.  PLoS Biology discussed the paper in a little more detail.  The original paper in PLoS Biology described how the growth proteins follow the “polarity field” set up by the PIN proteins.Feather art:  Bird feathers are vastly different from flower petals, but another amazing “mapping” mechanism controls their development.  Feathers can contain stripes, spots, and nano-patterns that play tricks with light; see examples in PhysOrg‘s coverage of a paper in Science Magazine.  What turns on the dark and light patterns?  The new research paper by Lin et al., “Topology of Feather Melanocyte Progenitor Niche Allows Complex Pigment Patterns to Emerge,” offers the beginnings of an answer:Melanocyte progenitors are distributed as a horizontal ring in the proximal follicle, sending melanocytes vertically up into the epithelial cylinder which gradually emerges as feathers grow. Different pigment patterns form by modulating the presence, arrangement, or differentiation of melanocytes. A layer of peripheral pulp further regulates pigmentation via patterned agouti expression. Lifetime feather cyclic regeneration resets pigment patterns for physiological needs. Thus, the evolution of stem cell niche topology allows complex pigment patterning via combinatorial co-option of simple regulatory mechanisms.By “evolution,” the authors cannot assume that blind, undirected processes create the patterns any more than they create intricate feathers themselves.  They merely mean that stem cells are regulated to generate the patterns.  But what tells the stem cells to differentiate according to a predetermined pattern?  What created the pattern in the first place that these mechanisms execute?  The explanation begs even deeper questions.Speaking of feathers, how would you like to dive into a feather on the wing of a red-tailed hawk and see its microscopic structure?  You can live this adventure, along with many others, in a new film just released in May from Illustra Media entitled, Flight: The Genius of Birds. (Click the link for trailer and ordering information.)  With cutting-edge science, stunning photography, an original music score and a thoughtful narration aided by the insight of biologists, the film makes a convincing case for intelligent design.  Along with the previous release Metamorphosis: The Beauty and Design of Butterflies, this new entry forms the foundation to Illustra’s new series of high-quality nature documentaries, The Design of Life.  Both were produced in High-Definition Blu-ray with 5.1 surround sound.We are very happy to co-sponsor Flight: The Genius of Birds and will be drawing attention to it all month.  CEH Editor David Coppedge worked closely with the producer on scientific research and proofing, but it was the genius of the production team led by Lad Allen, with his editor Jerry Harned, working with the biologists, the animators, the composer Mark Lewis and the sound technicians, and others, who made this film a masterpiece.  The DVD is great, but if you have a good home theater, this is a film to enjoy in an immersive environment, with a Blu-ray player, a large screen and a surround sound system.  Flight is the equal of secular nature documentaries—but without the Darwinism that is merely assumed by the others.  It includes several incredible true stories about particular bird species.  After being amazed by what you learn, and how beautifully it is presented, we are sure you will want to order extra copies of Flight to pass around.  Order today!  DVD ships May 14, Blu-ray on June 11.And by all means, if you haven’t yet watched Metamorphosis, order them both!  Readers delighted with the exceptional work of Illustra Media should support them financially.  They have plans to augment The Design of Life series with more superb documentaries on the wonders of the living world.  Nobody does it better than Illustra!  Their films are reaching around the world.  Be part of a team that is dismantling Darwinist materialism with clear, powerful, convincing evidence for design. 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South African classic The Suit made into a short film

first_img18 May 2016SA: @AtandwaKani stars alongside his father, John Kani in the upcoming locally produced movie ‘The Suit’ #Dstv872 pic.twitter.com/kIs7TA84kL— TransAfricaRadio (@TransAfrica872) March 9, 2016The short film version of Can Themba’s classic South African story, The Suit, has been written for screen and directed by fledgling filmmaker Jarryd Coetsee. The film stars Atandwa Kani, son of South African acting legend John Kani, in the lead role of Philemon.The story, set in 1950s apartheid South Africa, deals with the consequences of an extramarital affair gone wrong, but the metaphor acts as a more substantial comment on the brutal effects of the forced removals of the time. The story was banned by the National Party government when it was first published, but has since become a standard in high school set work curriculums; it has also been adapted for stage.Themba was a journalist for Drum magazine and an apartheid dissident. He died in exile in 1968.About his debut film, Coetsee, who first read the novel as a set work at school, told the South African Sunday Times newspaper that the story was still important. Its themes of personal space and humiliation offered a more emotional understanding today of the profound trauma experienced by millions of South Africans during apartheid.In the story, Philemon discovers a suit left by the lover of his wife, Matilda. He proceeds to use the suit to torment and humiliate her.“Oppression is cyclical and it affects personal relationships in a destructive way,” said Coetsee. “I can think of no time in our history when it has been more urgent to heed Themba’s cautionary tale because we are now at great risk of oppressive forces derailing our progress.”Watch the trailer belowThe Suit also stars Phuti Nakene as Matilda and John Kani in a small, supporting role.The film has been selected for the Zanzibar and Durban film festivals, with Coetsee and Kani hoping that word of mouth and some critical success might lead to it being shown at other international short film festivals over the next year.While it might only be in short-film format, no expense has been spared in recreating the era, offering a visual quality worthy of any feature-length production, thanks to Coetsee and his team at Mandala Films.He hopes that success for The Suit will spur on more short film narratives that will celebrate local stories, both old and new.Source: Times Livelast_img read more

Everything You Need to Know About the Premiere Pro Media Browser

first_imgImport Window vs. Media BrowserOne of the more common ways to import media into Premiere Pro is simply by using the Import command. Take a look at these P2 files when I use the import dialog box. I can see all of the MXF files nestled away in their subfolders. I can’t, however, preview any of the files or rename them. Now let’s take a look at these files in the Media Browser.To open the Media Browser, go to Window > Media Browser. Take note of the differences here when you look at the Import Window vs. the Media Browser panel. The Media Browser offers a simple way to browse, ingest, and even edit media directly in Premiere. Let’s take a look at each of these features.Browse, Preview, and ImportThe Media Browser offers features like hover scrub and filter by file type, which give you a lot of control over your browsing. You can even browse in a Premiere Project, looking through bins of the actual project. You can specify if you want Premiere to create a folder to keep your imported project nice and neat in one bin.EditWhen you select a clip in the Media Browser, it launches right in your source monitor. As with any clip, you can add in and out points and perform edits on the footage. Once you bring the footage into your timeline, Premiere will automatically add a reference file in the Project Panel.IngestYou can have the media browser ingest footage directly from a media device. As I stated before, simply importing the footage will not move the source footage anywhere. Importing is different from ingesting. When you ingest, you move the footage to a specified destination. Furthermore, when you ingest, you have four different options for how to handle the footage. They are Copy, Transcode, Create Proxy, Copy and Create Proxy. The default ingest location is Same as Project.What’s your experience with the Media Browser? Let us know in the comments. Save a time by previewing and importing files from the Premiere Pro Media Browser panel.Cover image via Shutterstock.I used to work with a lot of P2 files several years ago, and it was quite a headache. The folder structure of these MXF files is quite frustrating. Importing footage into Premiere was very counterintuitive. That’s when I discovered the Media Browser panel in Premiere Pro, which completely changed my workflow. Let’s take a closer look at the capabilities of this panel.last_img read more

Political Scientist Mark Jones available to comment on Arizona immigration bill

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: David RuthPHONE: 713-348-6327E-MAIL: [email protected] Political Scientist Mark Jones available to comment on Arizona immigration billMark Jones, chair of Rice University’s Political Science Department and Rice Scholar at the Baker Institute for Public Policy, is available to discuss yesterday’s federal judge ruling that stopped certain provisions in the state of Arizona’s new immigration law a day before it was to take effect. The decision all but guarantees a drawn-out legal battle from the state and Gov. Jan Brewer.Wednesday’s ruling prevented the following parts of Arizona’s bill from becoming law:Requiring officers to check immigration status while enforcing or investigating other laws.Requiring immigrants to carry their “papers” at all times.Prohibiting undocumented workers from seeking work in public places. According to the Houston Chronicle, Judge Susan Bolton’s 36-page decision said that the new Arizona law would hamper federal immigration enforcement efforts.Advocates for the bill say that the federal government hasn’t done enough to address the illegal immigration crisis, and that this bill will “uncuff” state and local police authorities in their attempt to do their jobs.Opponents of the bill say it will lead to racial profiling and make it more difficult for police to investigate crimes, as people will be afraid to report crimes or testify as witnesses to crimes. Many fear that under the legislation Latino citizens and other legal residents could have their civil rights violated.Jones is available for news media interviews today and through the weekend. He can conduct interviews in both English and Spanish. To speak with Jones, news media may contact David Ruth at 713-348-6327 or at [email protected] last_img read more