Tag: 南京夜生活网

Wildlight Goes All-Acoustic In Reworking Of ‘The Tide’ Album [Review/Full Stream]

first_imgWildlight’s The Tide acoustic redux invokes a sound and era that can be overlooked within our technologically-fueled society. The delicate performances harken back to a period and lifestyle rooted in the past; yet at once paving a path back toward lost innocence and social responsibility. This album serves as reminder that we can exist in that paradigm today. Reimagining the tunes from their stimulating sophomore opus as a stirring blend of global instrumentation, folk sensibilities, and indigenous influence, Ayla Nereo and David Sugalski (The Polish Ambassador) have crafted a statement bathing in sonic serenity.Listen to the album below.In tandem with the artists’ reverence, The Tide places a glistening spotlight on the earth, community, gratitude, healing and romance. Sugalski enlists a vibrant team of collaborators to facilitate an energetic transformation; The Tide’s formerly meditative dance music evolves elegantly into a softer, medicinal archetype. The creative ingenuity of lead producer Ryan Herr is a revelation. Sugalski’s compadre courts a courageous cavalcade, among them Tyson Leonard and Jesse Hendrix. The dexterous multi-instrumentalists employ a myriad of organic sounds to soothe and serenade with savoir-faire: banjo, violin, accordion, saxophone, flute, toy piano, melodica, duduk, mandolin, djembe, didgeridoo, kalimba, acoustic guitar and upright bass. These assembled artisans in antiquity deliver the listener to an intersection of love, hope, and awareness.Ayla Nereo’s multi-faceted melodies give rise to Wildlight’s impassioned vision and focused mission, the promise of our better tomorrow. From start to finish, Nereo’s femininity is found summoning the intrinsic power of her expressive voice. “Rain” and “From the Ground Up” feature poignant pleas in siren song: her angelic vocal tones calling to the spirits, these are soundtracks to the garden we have dreamt. On “The Crucible,” Nereo unveils a resolute rap and hauntingly gorgeous refrain, at once emotive and inspiring.”Ours to Give” is a soothing, warm lament on the benevolence within us all. “Holy Dust” features her aching, arching soprano, while “Grace, Fully” finds Nereo’s layered vocals basking in a bed of blissful banjo and lulling violin.Wildlight has created an organic, chilled vibe in rewiring their own previous brilliance. Filled with mystifying traditional music, this testimonial transmits a clear and focused intention; to empower community, heal wounds, celebrate love, and awaken the heroic human spirit. Full of evergreen hymns tuned to the magic of mother nature, The Tide (original) is revival strong enough to move mountains. Stripped of bass and bombast, this riveting reprise stays sublime in shadowed valleys.last_img read more

The Mash Up radio host learns from listeners

first_imgPoets and musicians collaborate on The Mash Up, a weekly SAfm radio show. Between them and the audience, they teach the host and listeners about South Africa’s musical history.Naledi Moleo, host of The Mash Up, says the first show was broadcast on 13 August 2016. It was nominated for Best Music show in the 2017 Liberty Radio Awards in April. (Image supplied)Melissa JavanTo learn about South African music from the listeners and the artists in studio is one of the benefits of hosting The Mash Up radio show on SA FM Radio, says Naledi Moleo.“Songs like Jikijela by Letta Mbulu and Naughty Little Flea by Miriam Makeba are songs we would never have sourced and played had it not been for the listeners and artists who have requested real South African classics,” she adds.The Mash Up, explains Moleo, is a weekly hour-long show broadcast on Saturdays. It features live poetry and music by renowned and upcoming South African poets and musicians. “Each week, The Mash Up will bring together a poet and a musician. Through interviews, live poetry and music performances, they collaborate by ‘mashing up’ their respective crafts.”The artists may also give a selection of their favourite South African songs. “The listeners will be introduced to artists from different backgrounds, ages and genres. The show is about nation building and celebrating the extraordinary talent from South Africa.“The listeners love it. I get excited especially when listeners SMS us, giving us names of musicians and poets that we should have on the show,” says Moleo.How it startedShe realised there was a major opportunity to create a platform for South African poets, says Moleo. “Poetry has the power to either make really difficult conversations more palatable or raise our awareness of injustices. More than anything, poetry can also just uplift and renew us.“I believe that South Africans really need that in this day and age. We are bombarded with so much bad news and pressure that it is necessary to reflect. I too am in need of therapy that the live music and poetry offer at the end of every long week.”It is just magical, she says, to watch two artists who have never collaborated forced to make it work live on air — they have no prior preparation. “They always come into the studio feeling completely nervous and leave on cloud nine because they are so proud of themselves.“South Africa has always been a country that enjoys music and poetry. Think of how we sing with every major event. Think of the praise poetry and official events and even traditional weddings. The Mash Up is just a reflection of how South Africans have always expressed themselves. As a talk radio host all I really am interested in is hearing those different forms of self-expression.”The collaborationsMoleo says the musicians are usually the underdogs in the industry. “Artists like Nono Nkoane, Msaki and Tribute Birdie Mboweni are immensely talented and underrated. We think it’s important to celebrate their work.“Every now and then we will also have some of the legends of the music industry. Maestros such as Lex Futshane, Vusi Mahlasela and Pops Mohamed have also graced our studio and it’s wonderful because we get to celebrate their wonderful work and share with a younger listener who perhaps hasn’t had the opportunity to interact with their work.”One of the collaborations was Tshepo Molefe and Sabelo Mthembu.#TheMashUp with @naledimoleo brings you poet @tshepomolefe942 and musician @sabelomthembu. Expect an hour of awesome live poetry and music pic.twitter.com/YtmwB6mhL3— SAfmRadio ? (@SAfmRadio) June 24, 2017#TheMashUp thanks so much to our guests this evening the phenomenal @sabelomthembu and wordsmith @tshepomolefe942 @naledimoleo pic.twitter.com/6Fdk60HnfO— SAfmRadio ? (@SAfmRadio) June 24, 2017Molefe has been writing poetry for two years. “It began when I was still a student at [the University of the Witwatersrand] and I entered a poetry competition called DFL Lover + Another. There, I met a poet who goes by the name NoLiFE [or Nobody Lives ForEver] and he introduced me to a platform called Cuddle Sessions. This in turn introduced me to the Joburg poetry scene. I haven’t looked back.”According to Molefe his poetry ranges from social issues, such as alcohol abuse and miscarriage from a father’s perspective, to political commentary to his own struggles and the problems he has with his family.He describes his experience on The Mash Up as amazing.Molefe believes collaborations such as these build a better and more versatile network between artists. “What I mean by ‘more versatile network between artists’ is often we get caught up our own artistic spaces, for instance I would normally stay in and interact with my poetry circles, and not know of other creative spaces that are out there.“Such spaces would include soul singers and instrumentalists. The Mash Up kind of collaborations opens doors for artists in different fields to first know that they exist and if they would someday want to work on a joint project, provided that they like each other’s work.”Musician Mthembu agrees: “I truly enjoyed it. I wasn’t sure what to expect. But the vibe between the poet and I was great. It was the first time I collaborated with a poet.“There was an instant gel of styles.”He says collaborations teach him that artists need each other to grow. “Working together we have the capacity to achieve more as a people.”Mthembu has been in the music industry for about 10 years. “I did backing vocals for Louise Carver for about five years before releasing my solo project.”He says although he started singing in church when he was five years old, singing was not a first career choice growing up. “I enjoyed doing it very much though. It was only after participating on South Africa’s Idols in 2007 that I decided to pursue it more aggressively.Besides Carver, he has contributed backing vocals on various artists’ projects. He calls his music “Afrosoul with a touch of jazz and classical music”.You can listen to the podcasts of The Mash Up here.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

South Africa’s competitive advantage in the developing world

first_imgDurban harbour is one of the 10 largest in the world. South Africa’s World Bank ranking for trading across borders has jumped by 29 positions, due to the roll-out of government policy that addresses the need to decrease the time, cost, and red tape companies have to deal with to get products to port and shipped to international markets. (Image: Brand South Africa) • Manusha Pillai Communications Manager Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122 [email protected] • Zuma urges Team SA to sell South Africa at Davos• WEF Davos 2014: Keeping up with a fast-changing world  • Watch: Davos 2014 pre-meeting press conference• Cape to Cairo trade agreement to open up African borders • Watch: The South African Competitiveness ForumMiller Matola, CEO of Brand South AfricaWhen the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) published its Human Development Report in 2013, it contained powerful insights about the increasingly important role developing countries, such as South Africa and Brazil, are playing in the 21st century.The UNDP indicates that the South (developing nations and emerging markets) currently produces half the world’s economic output. To further illustrate the significant shift in the global economic balance of power, the UNDP argues that the combined GDP of eight developing countries – Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa and Turkey – equals the GDP of the United States. This implies for the UNDP that countries such as Brazil, South Africa, India and China have become major drivers of the global economy and thus forces for change in the developing world.South Africa is becoming an economic force to be reckoned with in this rapidly changing global economic and, by implication, geopolitical environment, mainly due to the long-term socioeconomic vision and the associated policy-making of its government. Its successes, in terms of its global perception and rankings in key influential indices – such as the World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report, the World Bank Ease of Doing Business Index, the World Economic Forum Travel and Tourism Index – could set a benchmark for other emerging countries to follow.What emerges is a pattern of country performance indicating that South Africa matches and outperforms other peer developing countries in critical areas of national competency. These are important indicators to utilise in the process of positioning South Africa as a reliable trade partner, and attractive investment destination.This continuing improvement in performance on the global stage is attributable to strong and highly focused government policies that support the country’s global and regional growth aspirations. As South Africa heads for 20 years of democracy, the country occupies an increasingly strong position globally, as a developing nation, in the early 21st century.The many global economic indicators used to assess the strength of nation brands highlight that South Africa has unique competitive strengths in the context of the developing world, and these are being leveraged to good effect to enhance the country’s standing in the global marketplace. This can be seen in the broader context of South Africa’s inclusion into the Brics grouping of nations, and the country’s competitiveness compared to other developing nations.Ease of doing businessThe most recent World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Index ranks the country’s financial services sector, banks and stock exchange as the top global performers, while the country places 15th globally for the quality of its air transport infrastructure.Furthermore, South Africa, if compared to the other Brics nations, comes first in five of the 10 criteria the World Bank uses to assess ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting credit, protecting investors, and paying taxes. This means that South Africa offers protection to foreign direct investments, and is certainly a business-friendly environment wherein new trade, investment, and related economic interactions can be fostered.The South African government’s commitment to creating an environment that makes it easy for companies to do business in the country has been recognised in the latest edition of the World Bank’s East of Doing Business Index (DBI), published in 2013. South Africa now ranks first among the Brics nations in six critical DBI criteria. The country can therefore make a strong business case to attract trade partners, investment, and clients from fellow Brics members. As a nation that offers several competitive advantages, an open business environment is an important feature to utilise as a selling point for South Africa as a business destination. New government policies introduced now make starting a business in the country easier than ever, by implementing new company law that eliminates the requirement to reserve a company name and simplifies the incorporation documents. South Africa has also made transferring property less costly and more efficient by reducing the transfer duty and introducing electronic filing.In addition, a new reorganisation process has been introduced to facilitate the rehabilitation of financially distressed companies. South Africa has also improved its performance on the trading across borders rank. In the same World Bank Index, South Africa has significantly improved its rankings (by 29 positions), due to the roll-out of government policy that addresses the need to decrease the time, cost, and red tape companies have to deal with to get products to port and shipped to international markets.Travel and tourismSouth Africa is also praised for its government policies, rules and regulations relating to travel and tourism, and their conduciveness to the sector’s development. The country now ranks 29th out of 140 countries globally in the World Economic Forum’s Travel and Tourism Index, indicating that it has been making steady improvements in this area over the past few assessments.South Africa ranks third in the Sub-Saharan Africa region after Seychelles (first) and Mauritius (second). Important findings from WEF indicate South Africa comes in high at 17th place for its natural resources, and 58th for cultural resources. This, according to WEF, is due primarily to the country’s many World Heritage sites, rich fauna, creative industries, and the many international fairs and exhibitions hosted. The latter can be interpreted as a strong selling point for the country, with communications implications. A further positive finding WEF indicates is that South Africa’s infrastructure is well developed for the region, directly supporting the growth of the travel and tourism trade, with air transport infrastructure ranked 43rd, and a particularly good assessment of railroad quality (46th) and road quality (42nd).The golden thread that ties together and underpins all of these world ranking achievements for South Africa is the strength and innovative nature of its government policies, from the National Development Plan to the National Infrastructure Plan. Such strong government policy making and implementation sends a clear message to the world that South Africa is open for business and is a destination of choice for investment, based on solid and trusted fundamentals. This is a strategic, best practice approach that could be replicated for the benefit of fellow emerging market countries around the world.last_img read more

Zaheer ruled out of 3rd Test, Unadkat replaces him

first_imgIndia were dealt a big blow ahead of the third cricket Test against New Zealand with pace spearhead Zaheer Khan being ruled out of the final rubber because of a groin injury.Young left-handed pacer Jaydev Unadkat has been drafted in the squad in place of him.Zaheer suffered an groin injury during the second cricket Test, which ended in a tame draw at the Rajiv Gandhi International stadium.”Zaheer Khan is injured and is unavailable for the Third Test against New Zealand, to be played at Nagpur from 20th November to 24th November,” BCCI secretary N Srinivasan said in a release.”The All India Selection Committee has chosen Jayadev Unadkat to replace Zaheer Khan in the squad,” it said.Zaheer was off the field for a good part of the fourth day. The left-handed pacer bowled just three overs during the fifth day.19-year-old Unadkat was named in India’s Under-19 squad for the 2010 World Cup in New Zealand. The left-arm fast bowler represents Saurashtra in the Ranji Trophy and has claimed 26 wickets in six first-class games at an average of 26.34.last_img read more