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Further unrest in Derry as PSNI tackle four ‘security devices’

first_imgPolice have had to evacuated homes during a “number” of security alerts in Derry this morning, Easter Sunday.A PSNI spokesperson said there was “major disruption” as Iniscarn Road, Harty Court and Moss Park were sealed off.A section of the Strand Road has also been closed to traffic. One of the devices was found outside the home of Derry republican councillor Gary Donnelly, where the explosion was carried out.A 39-year-old man has since been arrested and taken to the Serious Crime Suite at Musgrave Police Station for questioning.Further unrest in Derry as PSNI tackle four ‘security devices’ was last modified: April 21st, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

South African classic The Suit made into a short film

first_img18 May 2016SA: @AtandwaKani stars alongside his father, John Kani in the upcoming locally produced movie ‘The Suit’ #Dstv872 pic.twitter.com/kIs7TA84kL— TransAfricaRadio (@TransAfrica872) March 9, 2016The short film version of Can Themba’s classic South African story, The Suit, has been written for screen and directed by fledgling filmmaker Jarryd Coetsee. The film stars Atandwa Kani, son of South African acting legend John Kani, in the lead role of Philemon.The story, set in 1950s apartheid South Africa, deals with the consequences of an extramarital affair gone wrong, but the metaphor acts as a more substantial comment on the brutal effects of the forced removals of the time. The story was banned by the National Party government when it was first published, but has since become a standard in high school set work curriculums; it has also been adapted for stage.Themba was a journalist for Drum magazine and an apartheid dissident. He died in exile in 1968.About his debut film, Coetsee, who first read the novel as a set work at school, told the South African Sunday Times newspaper that the story was still important. Its themes of personal space and humiliation offered a more emotional understanding today of the profound trauma experienced by millions of South Africans during apartheid.In the story, Philemon discovers a suit left by the lover of his wife, Matilda. He proceeds to use the suit to torment and humiliate her.“Oppression is cyclical and it affects personal relationships in a destructive way,” said Coetsee. “I can think of no time in our history when it has been more urgent to heed Themba’s cautionary tale because we are now at great risk of oppressive forces derailing our progress.”Watch the trailer belowThe Suit also stars Phuti Nakene as Matilda and John Kani in a small, supporting role.The film has been selected for the Zanzibar and Durban film festivals, with Coetsee and Kani hoping that word of mouth and some critical success might lead to it being shown at other international short film festivals over the next year.While it might only be in short-film format, no expense has been spared in recreating the era, offering a visual quality worthy of any feature-length production, thanks to Coetsee and his team at Mandala Films.He hopes that success for The Suit will spur on more short film narratives that will celebrate local stories, both old and new.Source: Times Livelast_img read more

Avian influenza in southern Indiana not affecting grocery prices

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Avian influenza that led to the culling of 414,000 turkeys and chickens at southern Indiana commercial poultry farms is having little effect on prices of turkey and eggs at grocery stores, a Purdue University agricultural economist says.Estimates of quarterly prices show changes by plus or minus 1%, which are within fluctuations normally seen in these markets, Philip Paarlberg said.“With these price changes there will be very little impact on consumers,” he said. “At least that is how it stands now.”Some countries have restricted imports of poultry and poultry products following the Jan. 15 announcement of confirmation that highly pathogenic avian influenza infected a southern Indiana poultry flock. Canada has recognized the established control zones in accordance with the zoning agreement with the United States. Mexico, Japan and Cuba have restricted Indiana poultry products while the European Union has U.S. county-level restrictions. South Korea has imposed restrictions on the entire United States.Those restrictions have tended to offset the loss of production and to lower prices – ever so slightly — in the U.S. because of the decreased demand for exports.Turkey prices have been largely unaffected because the 258,000 birds destroyed represent only about 0.1% of the turkeys produced nationally. The 156,000 laying hens that were culled also represent a very small fraction of layers raised nationally.Any additional incidents of avian influenza H7N8, the strain that led to the culling, could result in greater price fluctuations depending on conditions such as a significant disruption of supplies or further declines in poultry exports.While the financial impact on the total poultry industry from the situation in Dubois County is small, Paarlberg said the incident will have a major impact on the farms involved and the community, including the disruption of producers’ livelihoods and any temporary reduction in jobs of workers.“So the impact is primarily local,” he said.Dubois County is Indiana’s largest turkey-producing county, growing 1.4 million birds annually. Indiana ranks fourth in the nation in turkey production.Turkeys at 10 sites infected with H7N8 avian influenza were destroyed. Besides the one flock with highly pathogenic avian influenza, eight flocks had low pathogenic avian influenza, and testing of one other flock was continuing.The laying hens were not infected with H7N8 but were culled because the laying facility was near an infected barn of turkeys and were considered at risk of contracting the virus.The Indiana Board of Animal Health said this week that testing will continue for several more weeks in the area to ensure than no more H7N8 strain remains.The Centers for Disease Control considers the risk of illness to humans from the strain to be very low. It says properly cooked and handled poultry is not a source of infection for avian influenza viruses.last_img read more

Thoughts on Nuclear Power

first_imgContinuing in the recent thread of examining various power generation technologies, this week I’ll weigh in on nuclear power. I do this against my wife’s better judgment, and perhaps out of concern that my columns haven’t been generating enough controversy.Let me start with the bottom line—that I am generally opposed to nuclear power, and I do not support the relicensing of Vermont Yankee beyond 2012. But some of my thoughts on both the benefits and concerns about nuclear power differ considerably from the standard no-nukes arguments.What’s to like about nuclear power?Given the specter of global climate change precipitated largely by fossil fuel combustion since the dawn of the Industrial Age, society must find alternatives to these old habits and the corresponding emissions of carbon dioxide. While nuclear power isn’t quite the carbon-free energy solution that most nuclear proponents suggest (due to carbon emissions associated with the uranium fuel cycle, plant construction, decommissioning, and so forth), the carbon intensity associated with nuclear power is far lower than that of coal, oil, or natural gas power generation. Many experts, including vice president Al Gore, argue that dealing with climate change is the “moral imperative” of our age, and quite a few environmentalists are suggesting—to even their own surprise—that nuclear power needs to be a part of the solution.Solving the waste storage conundrumHere’s where I’ll raise some eyebrows among my environmental friends. I believe that one of the most commonly raised concerns about nuclear power could be solved quite easily if we were a little smarter and were willing to consider a wholesale shift in our approach. The storage solution being developed today and for the last 30 years—sequestering high-level waste deep inside Nevada’s Yucca Mountain—would provide the highest level of safety at day one, then that level of safety would steadily decrease over time due to seismic activity, volcanism (the ridge is comprised mostly of volcanic tuff, emitted from a volcano), erosion, migrating aquifers, and other natural geologic actions. (Completing this facility has also met with so much resistance and delay that many doubt it will ever actually be opened.)It seems to me that a far better solution for nuclear waste storage would be to put it in a place where the level of protection would increase over time. Why not bury it in a stable area of seafloor where sediment is being deposited at a fairly rapid rate. We know how to drill holes in the bottoms of oceans using undersea oil drilling technology—which could be adapted for this new purpose.The nuclear waste could be stabilized (perhaps by “vitrifying” it into a glass form) and dropped into these holes, which would then be filled back in or capped. In some areas, more than a centimeter of sediment is being added to the seafloor every year. Over a few hundred years, a foot of compressed sediment would be deposited in these locations, and over several thousand years, that compacted sediment would be well on its way to becoming protective sedimentary rock. These small areas of ocean could be designated as off-limited to other uses to avoid accidents.I’m far from an expert in nuclear waste, but I did take some geology courses back in my college days, and it just seems like common sense to put a dangerous material somewhere where the protection would get more—rather than less—robust over time.Guessing that I wasn’t the first to suggest this storage option, I went to Google to see what’s been said about it. I found some fairly well-developed science on “sub-seabed storage” (the technical term for this approach)—and even support for the idea from a past president of the Union of Concerned Scientists.Research into sub-seabed storage was supported by the U.S. Government from the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s, when the efforts were killed in favor of the Yucca Mountain “solution.” Politics, not science, seemed to spell its demise. There’s an excellent article on this from the Atlantic Monthly in October 1986.Lest you think I’ve joined the ranks of Patrick Moore and other environmentalists who have shifted their position on nuclear power, I have not. I believe that some of the problems with nuclear power are solvable—such as long-term storage—but others are much tougher. Stay tuned; next week I’ll lay out these concerns.last_img read more

Canon Joins the Mirrorless Camera Game with the EOS M50

first_imgIndustry news: Canon has recently announced their latest release — the EOS M50, the company’s first 4K mirrorless camera.Image via Canon.Coming in at the low price of $780, Canon’s latest M-series release is the company’s first foray into 4K territory. Canon has employed their new DIGIC 8 image processor, enabling the new camera to capture raw 4K video. However, while this camera is an improvement over the M5, which lacked 4K capabilities, the M50 can only shoot 24p in 4K. Let’s take a look at some of the camera’s other features.Though the 4K capability is nice, there is a 1.6X APS-C crop factor, and the dual-pixel auto-focus is limited to 1080p. Given the previous M-series cameras, one can’t help but ask what the point is? If this is a cheaper, entry-level camera, then what incentive do users have for buying the more expensive M5 and M6 models?With a 24.1 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, the DIGIC 8 Image Processor and a variety of brilliant interchangeable lens options, the EOS M50 camera can help you get photos and videos with incredible color, sharp and clear details and stunning dynamic range.This camera will appeal to vloggers and daily content creators. There’s built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, and a flippable touch screen perfect for turning the camera on yourself. The M50 also features improved 143 autofocus points — but apparently only 99 autofocus points will work with certain lenses. However, on a brighter note, there is a new eye-detection focusing feature that focuses on your subject’s eyes with a simple tap of the touchscreen.The camera allows you to shoot with EF lenses, but you’ll need the EF-EOS M adapter. Unlike other mirrorless cameras currently on the market, the M50 does not feature in-body optical stabilization.Specs:4K Recording at 24p.Dual Pixel CMOS AF (Face+Tracking AF, Zone AF, 1-point AF).AF Points — 143/99 points.EF-M lens (and EF/EF-S lenses when using Mount Adapter EF-EOS M).Image Format — Approx. 22.3 x 14.9mm (APS-C Size).24.1 Megapixel (APS-C) sensor.12.4 oz. / 351g (body only).Recording Format — EXIF 2.31 (DCF2.0).If you’re interested in what else we might see in 2018, check out our camera rumors coverage.Looking for more information on video gear? Check out these articles.Illuminate Shortcuts with logickeyboard’s Cinema 4D Backlit KeyboardWhy Cinema Lenses Will Improve Your Next Film ProjectWhat’s the Difference Between a Cheap Microphone and an Expensive One?ARRI Delivers a Knockout With Its First Large Format Camera SystemA Look at the ARRI/Zeiss Master and Ultra Prime Lenseslast_img read more

Wrestler Sushil Kumar storms into finals at the London Olympics, assures India of at least a silver medal

first_imgSushil Kumar assured India of a sixth medal at the London Olympics and his second successive at the Games by powering into the men’s 66kg freestyle wrestling final at the ExCel Arena in London on Sunday.Sushil, bronze medallist in Beijing four years ago, edged out Kazakhstan’s Akzhurek Tanatarov 3-1 in a thrilling semi-final, his third fight of the day. He faces Japanese Tatsuhiro Yonemitsu in the gold medal play-off later on Sunday.With the win, he bettered his Beijing performance and ensured India its second medal from wrestling in London after Yogeshwar Dutt won the bronze in the 60kg freestyle event Saturday.India’s other medallists at the London Games are shooters Vijay Kumar (silver) and Gagan Narang (bronze), boxer M.C. Mary Kom (bronze) and badminton star Saina Nehwal (bronze), contributing in the country’s best medal haul at the Olympics.Tanatarov seemed the likely winner during the third and final period before Sushil fought back through grit and experience.With the Kazakh leading 3-0, Sushil came up with brilliant moves to leave Tanatarov reeling on the mat. The contest ended with the Indian winning the period 6-3 and his opponent bleeding from the right ear.Sushil had won the first period 3-0 and Kazakh levelled the fight in the second with the same scoreline.Earlier, the 2010 World Champion muscled his way into the last four beating Ikhtiyor Navruzov of Uzbekistan 3-1.The Indian could have wrapped up the fight in period 2 but Navruzov turned the tables on him with six seconds remaining.advertisementSushil got the measure of his opponent in period 3, winning it 2-0 to seal the contest.The 29-year-old started the day in a scintillating fashion, dismissing the Beijing gold medallist, Ramazan Sahin, in the opening round.last_img read more

Roma Hires Claudio Ranieri as Coach Until the End of the Season

first_imgROME (AP) — Roma appointed Claudio Ranieri as interim coach on Friday, a day after firing Eusebio Di Francesco following the Italian team’s elimination from the Champions League.The 67-year-old Ranieri, who will be interim coach until the end of the season, flew to Rome on Friday and signed a contract until June 30.It will be the Rome-born Ranieri’s second spell as coach of the club, having previously been in charge from 2009-11.“I’m delighted to be coming back home,” said Ranieri, who grew up supporting the team. “When Roma call you, it’s impossible to say no.”FILE – In this Friday, Feb. 22, 2019 file photo, Fulham manager Claudio Ranieri gestures during the English Premier League soccer match between West Ham and Fulham at the London Stadium in London. Roma has appointed Claudio Ranieri as interim coach until the end of the season to replace Eusebio Di Francesco, who it fired following the Italian team’s elimination from the Champions League. The 67-year-old Ranieri flew into Rome on Friday and signed a contract until June 30. It will be the Rome-born Ranieri’s second spell as coach of the capital club, having previously been in charge from 2009-2011. Ranieri says: “I’m delighted to be coming back home. When Roma call you, it’s impossible to say no.” (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File )Ranieri, who led Leicester to the 2016 Premier League title, was fired by Fulham last week.During his first spell in charge of Roma, Ranieri led the team to a second-place finish in Serie A, two points behind Inter Milan. That team also lost the Italian Cup final to Inter.“We are delighted to welcome Claudio Ranieri back to the club,” Roma president James Pallotta said.Roma fired De Francesco a day after the team lost to Porto in the last 16 of the Champions League. That defeat came on the heels of a 3-0 loss to crosstown rival Lazio in Serie A, with the team fifth in the standings and in danger of missing out on next season’s Champions League.FILE – In this file photo taken on March 6, 2019 Eusebio Di Francesco gestures during the Champions League round of 16, 2nd leg, soccer match between FC Porto and AS Roma at the Dragao stadium in Porto, during his last match as Roma coach. Roma has appointed Claudio Ranieri as interim coach until the end of the season to replace Eusebio Di Francesco, who was fired following the Italian team’s elimination from the Champions League. (AP Photo/Luis Vieira)Roma sports director Ramon Rodriguez Verdejo, known as Monchi, left the club on Friday.“We have one objective remaining this season and that is to finish in the highest possible league position and secure qualification for the Champions League,” Pallotta said. “At this stage of the campaign, it was important to bring in a coach who knows the club, understands the environment, can speak the language and is able to motivate the players. Claudio ticks all of those boxes and he’s very excited to take on this challenge.”Ranieri’s first match in charge will be against relegation-threatened Empoli on Monday.The top four from Serie A qualify for next season’s Champions League. Roma is three points behind fourth-place Inter and four below AC Milan.“Claudio’s from the city, he’s a Roma fan but more than that, he’s one of the most experienced coaches in world soccer,” Roma director and former player Francesco Totti said. “What we need now is a safe pair of hands to guide us back into the top four and ensure that we are playing Champions League soccer again next season. We have 12 games left and we need to win as many of them as possible.”TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

It is great: West Indies captain Jason Holder on Chris Gayle’s retirement backflip

first_imgIt was like West Indies skipper Jason Holder was discovering a surprise gift, hearing the news Chris Gayle planned to play on after the World Cup.Holder’s eyes lit up, and he smiled broadly when the subject turned from the must-win World Cup game against India to the prospect of 39-year-old Gayle sticking around to play a series of one-day internationals against India in August and possibly a Test match on home soil.Gayle is a larger-than-life character, and Holder laughed when he reflected Wednesday on the star batsman’s latest surprise.”He didn’t really say anything in the dressing room. But, yeah, it’s great and it’s great for cricket,” said Holder, who found out about the retirement backflip from the team’s media manager. “It’s good to have Chris around. He’s got a lot to offer still. Hopefully, his body can hold up. Hopefully, he can be on the field a bit longer for West Indies.”Asked for how much longer Gayle could continue representing the West Indies, Holder said he’d have to check in first with the veteran Jamaican.”I guess I have to go downstairs and have a serious conversation with him,” Holder said. “But, yeah, if he’s dedicated to playing for West Indies any longer, I feel it’s definitely going to benefit us having him around.”Gayle has scored 25 centuries in 295 ODI matches since his debut in 1999, and 15 centuries in 103 test matches. He averages 38 in the 50-over format, and 42 in the five-day format. When he goes big, he goes really big. His test high score is 333 and his ODI-high 215 against Zimbabwe in 2015 contained 16 sixes, both World Cup records which have been subsequently broken.advertisementHe retired from ODIs for a while, but returned for another shot at the World Cup and his impact on the home series against England in February and March gave a young Caribbean squad belief in its ability to beat the highly-ranked teams.West Indies started well, skittling Pakistan for 105 and then having defending champion Australia reeling, but lost that game and haven’t won since. The five-run loss to New Zealand here last Saturday came down to one shot – Carlos Brathwaite caught on the boundary for 101 trying to hit a six for victory.Gayle scored 87 against New Zealand, his highest score of the tournament to date. He’s promising more against India, and in the following two games which West Indies need to win to have any chance of reaching the playoffs.Also Read | I am definitely up there with greats of West Indies cricket: Chris GayleAlso See:last_img read more