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Zion Williamson ‘getting stronger’ following knee injury

first_img Beau Lund Written by November 7, 2019 /Sports News – National Zion Williamson ‘getting stronger’ following knee injurycenter_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images(NEW ORLEANS) — New Orleans Pelicans rookie Zion Williamson told reporters on Thursday that he’s feeling “stronger,” following surgery on his right knee. “When [the training staff] feels like I’m back to myself, they’ll let me play,” the number one overall draft pick said Thursday. “It’s as simple as that.”The highly-touted rookie was diagnosed with a torn meniscus just before the start of the regular season. The team initially said it expected Williamson to miss six to eight weeks, which would allow him to return in early December.“The trainers are telling me it’s getting stronger,” Williamson said, “and I can feel the difference day by day.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Photos: Ex-49ers star sells Santa Clara home

first_imgFormer San Francisco 49ers star running back Frank Gore has sold his Santa Clara, Calif. townhouse for $1.298 million.Click here if viewing from a mobile device.The 1,894 square-foot three-bedroom, three-bath unit has many fixtures of a modern townhome: hardwood floors, recessed lighting and stainless-steel appliances. But it also touts customized features such as a 350-gallon fish tank and an entertainment center with multiple televisions. There is also a remote-controlled drop-down …last_img

Io, Io, It’s Off to Work We Go

first_imgThe innermost large moon of Jupiter, Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system.  About the size of our moon but no more than a speck of light in small telescopes, it caused a sensation when Galileo first glimpsed it and the other three major satellites of Jupiter in 1610.  Back then, it upset tradition about the hierarchy of the heavens; today, it is upsetting tradition about the age and composition of planetary bodies.  The volcanos were first observed by the Voyagers in 1979, and have been monitored with earth instruments since then, but were most clearly and dramatically revealed by the Galileo spacecraft between 1995 and 2003.  Now that its seven-year orbital tour of the Jupiter system is history, planetary scientists are trying to come to grips with the startling findings from all four large moons.  The May issue of Icarus is devoted to the puzzles of Io, whose volcanos dwarf those on earth.  “Io After Galileo” provides a status report, a state of the moon address, before it’s off to work they go for more data mining and problem solving.    Most of the articles are descriptive of the dramatic and colorful volcanos seen in the photographic images: Tupan Patera, a lava lake 47 miles across and half a mile deep; Tvashtar Catena, a chain of craters that displayed a 240-mile-high plume and 30-mile-long fire fountain; Thor, an eruption that reached 310 miles high; Amirami, the largest lava flow in the solar system; mountains towering up to 36,000 feet (Everest is 29,000); and much more.  The fact that such activity could exist on a small moon that should be mostly frozen by now is calling into question traditional theories about the dynamics of planetary interiors.  Io’s lavas, for instance, are generally much hotter than the basaltic lavas on earth.  It appears they contain heavy elements like iron and magnesium (called ultramafic lavas).  Theory demands that the heavy elements sink into the interior; how can these heavy elements erupt out onto the surface?  What drives the incessant heat flow that is as active at the poles as at the equator, and shows no cooling down during the night?    The first-order explanation is that Io is tidally pumped by its orbital resonance between Jupiter and Europa.  Like a rubber ball repeatedly squeezed, Io’s tides generate heat and that heat has to come out.  Volcanic activity was actually predicted on this principle shortly before Voyager 1 arrived.  The problem is that there is more heat flow – by an order of magnitude – than most models of tidal flexing predict.  Veeder, Matson, Johnson, Davies and Blaney1 have made the problem worse in their paper by recalculating the heat flow from thermal anomalies and adding in the extra amount detected from polar sources, arriving at a weighted average of 2.5 watts per square meter – “well above that predicted by most theories of tidal dissipation in Jupiter and Io.”  Considering all the heat emitted by cooling lavas over the entire surface, Matson in an earlier paper had set an upper bound of 13.5 watts per square meter.  This is nearly five times the heat coming out of Yellowstone’s thermal basins.    The final paper by Keszthelyi, Jaeger, Turtle, Milazzo and Radebaugh2 is entitled “A post-Galileo view of Io’s interior.”  In proposing their “mushy magma ocean” model, in which the interior has no solid core but is mushy all way through, they seem to be meekly standing up with bulls-eyes painted on their backs, waiting for the inevitable criticisms: how can the tall mountains exist?  How does the model prevent runaway melting?  How do you stop the magma from escaping too fast?  How do you prevent differentiation?  More complex models will be required, they meekly admit, and “Such future work may show that the mushy magma ocean model will need to be further refined, or even rejected.”  They point to previous critiques: “ Stevenson (2002) predicts that a mush zone >20 km deep would be unstable over geologic timescales.  Another issue is that, if the temperature of the mantle were to change significantly on a time scale of less than 106 [one million] years, then our model for stresses in the lithosphere would be inaccurate (McKinnon et al., 2001).”  Hey, it’s only a model, a “useful starting point for future discussions.”  So Io, it’s off to work we go.1Glenn J. Veeder, Dennis L. Matson, Torrence V. Johnson, Ashley G. Davies and Diana L. Blaney, “The polar contribution to the heat flow of Io,” Icarus Volume 169, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 264-270, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.11.016.2Laszlo Keszthelyi, Windy L. Jaeger, Elizabeth P. Turtle, Moses Milazzo and Jani Radebaugh, “A post-Galileo view of Io’s interior,” Icarus Volume 169, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 271-286; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.01.005.One model they never seem to consider is that Io might not be as old as they assume.  Did you catch the phrase “geologic timescales”?  That’s code for 4.6 billion years.  If the model does not fit “geologic timescales” then the model must be tweaked till it does.  4.6 billion years is the golden parameter, the figure that must not be altered, because Darwinian evolution depends on it.    Io might be considered just a special case if it were alone in displaying recent surface activity.  Actually, most of the moons in the solar system possess young-looking features that defy long ages.  Europa may be gushing out water even today, Ganymede indicates recent cryovolcanism against expectations and has a global magnetic field, and Callisto shows signs of erosion and has an induced magnetic field.  Tidal flexing is not available to explain these features.  Same at Saturn: Enceladus shows widespread resurfacing and may have active water volcanos, Dione and Rhea show vast fields of surface frost, Iapetus is half-coated in dark material, and Titan has an atmosphere that is quickly eroding.  At Uranus, Ariel and Titania show resurfacing and Miranda is a mosaic of old-looking and young-looking features.  Even as far out as Neptune, the coldest body in the solar system – Triton, at 300 below zero – has active nitrogen geysers and few craters, looking like much of its surface has been reworked recently.  Back at home, our own moon exhibits transient lunar phenomena, short-lived bright or gaseous emissions from an interior that should long ago have solidified if as old as claimed.  Io is forcing planetary geologists to question their assumptions.  Would that one of them would break rank and question the assumption of 4.6 billion years.  But that would be aiding and abetting the enemy, the young-earth creationists.  No respectable scientist would want to be caught dead in such a trespass, or risk offending the Darwin Party.    Check out this issue of Icarus.  Look at the pictures and read the descriptions with a mind freed of evolutionary presuppositions.  Where does the evidence lead?(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Evolutionists Confess to Lying

first_imgIf lying evolved as a fitness strategy, can we believe anything an evolutionist says?In his blog entry “The Evolution of Lying” on The Conversation, Rob Brooks, a professor of Evolutionary Ecology and Director of the Evolution & Ecology Research Centre at University of New South Wales, gave half-hearted credit to a new theory on deception as a by-product of the evolution of cooperation.  The open-access paper by two Irish evolutionists, Luke McNally and Andrew L. Jackson, was published by the Royal Society this week.  It posits lying as an evolutionary strategy:Our results suggest that the evolution of conditional strategies may, in addition to promoting cooperation, select for astute cheating and associated psychological abilities. Ultimately, our ability to convincingly lie to each other may have evolved as a direct result of our cooperative nature.Brooks agrees that lying evolved, but feels the model of McNally and Jackson is too simplistic.  “I would like to see if it can help us understand the fine-scale tensions between cooperation and dishonesty in human affairs,” he said.  “There is a lot more to lying than simply misrepresenting the world.”  The liar can deceive himself as well, for instance, in order to make the lie more believable.From there, Brooks considered Sam Harris’s short e-book Lying, in which Harris advocates we all try to do better at overcoming our evolutionary tendencies, “arguing we can both simplify our own lives and build better societies by telling the truth in situations when we might be tempted to lie.”  Here’s how Brooks concludes all this discussion about lies and truth (bold added, italics in original):Harris gets bottom-up processes and the conflict between individual benefits and group functioning. His book is worth a read for his impassioned argument that each of us, as individuals, would benefit from resisting the urge to lie.I’m not convinced. What would help right now is some theoretic and empirical evidence that showed the conditions under which Harris’ prescriptions might work. And that’s the beauty of papers like today’s one from McNally and Jackson.Irrespective, a better understanding of how lying evolves, no matter how simple, might do enormous social good.For one thing it might help constrain the worst dishonesties in politics, public relations and propaganda.The question none of them are considering is, if lying evolved, and if self-deception is possible, and if deception can be very convincing, how are the readers to know who is telling the truth?Imagine a liar so skilled, he convinces his listeners that he is 100% against the worst dishonesties in politics, public relations and propaganda.  He tells you he wants to achieve enormous social good to provide a better understanding of how lying evolves.  Now, add to it that he is self-deceived.  Doesn’t his credibility implode?  How could one possibly believe a word he says?Brooks has the Yoda complex.  So do McNally and Jackson.  They believe they can look down on the rest of humanity from some exalted plane free of the evolutionary forces that afflict the rest of humanity.  No; they need to climb down and join the world their imaginations have created.  In the evolutionary world, there is no essential difference between cooperation and deception.  It’s only a matter of which side is in the majority at the moment.To see this, consider a majority of humans in a population that are self-deceived and believe that by giving magic Kool-Aid to the defectors, laced with cyanide, they will help them become cooperators.  The few defectors in that situation who try to stop them would be perceived by the majority as the real liars and non-cooperators.  By what standard would anyone in this Darwinian world know the difference between truth and lies?Having no eternal standard of truth, the evolutionary world collapses into power struggles.  The appeals by Brooks and Sam Harris to try to “resist our temptations to lie” are meaningless.  How can anyone overcome what evolution has built into them?  How can either of them know what is true?Since all these evolutionists believe that lying evolved as a fitness strategy, and since they are unable to distinguish between truth and lies, they essentially confess to lying themselves.  Their readers are therefore justified in considering them deceivers, and dismissing everything they say, including the notion that lying evolved.An even stupider notion came out of the Association for Psychological Science.  This is the evolutionary story that “political motivations may have evolutionary links to physical strength”  (see also Science Daily with its photo of a guy flexing his bicep).  A group of Darwine-drunk psychologists are trying to convince the world that “Men’s upper-body strength predicts their political opinions on economic redistribution.”  According to them, “an evolutionary perspective may help to illuminate political motivations, at least those of men.” Strong men oppose redistribution of wealth, namby-pamby men and women support it, they claim.  It’s not clear if they intended to impugn Obama’s masculinity this way, and those of all his staff, but it doesn’t really matter how many biceps they measured in their survey of political opinions. (Exercise: list exceptions to their “rule” from world history.)   You know their whole premise is false from their comment, “This is among the first studies to show that political views may be rational in another sense, in that they’re designed by natural selection to function in the conditions recurrent over human evolutionary history.”  OK, their point is?  If physical strength is a measure of fitness “designed” by natural selection, then anti-redistributionism is a measure of fitness, too.  Get the wimps out of the way!  They’re impeding evolutionary progress.  Isn’t “self-interest” the highest good in Darwinism?  We won’t belabor the misconception of conservatism they presented, because they already defeated their credibility by calling natural selection “rational.”  Readers are justified in dismissing everything these quacks say, too, if they had any inclination left to trust the word of “evolutionary psychologists” about anything. (Visited 493 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA police in partnership to fight crime

first_img8 August 2013 Leaders from South Africa’s Institute for Security Studies, Business against Crime South Africa, AgriSA and the South African Banking Risk Information Centre have pledged their support to the country’s police service in the fight against crime. “We needed to interact with these important partners who have helped us in our crime reduction programmes,” Mthethwa said in Pretoria on Tuesday. “As the ministry, we move from a premise that it is only through strong partnerships that we can create safer environments, which enable economic development, growth and attract investments.” The ministry maintains ongoing partnerships with different stakeholders – from business, researchers, academics, community policing forums and labour unions to NGOs who give insights which have assisted in policy formulations and practical programmes. “In fact, our approach as government is not premised along an impression that we are experts who know better; rather, we see them as equal partners in helping us address the challenge confronting us, which is to ensure that South Africans are and feel safe,” he said. “In our efforts of creating a police service that is professional, accountable, transparent and responsive, we also shared and discussed the Green Paper on Policing.” The meeting also covered the challenges that the South African Police Service is currently grappling with, including corruption and poor conduct of police officers. Mthethwa said it should not be a government-only responsibility to tackle crime – and such partnerships have enabled police management to better grasp and understand some of the key issues faced by police. “We are under no illusion that there are quick fix solutions to policing challenges in South Africa,” he said. “We do believe that over the last year, we have begun to put in place processes that are not only yielding some successes, but will also become the building blocks for the police service we envisage.” The minister and the partners agreed to cement these engagements through ongoing interactions, which will include a development of a practical programme with clear time frames, sharing of information and best practices. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

South African classic The Suit made into a short film

first_img18 May 2016SA: @AtandwaKani stars alongside his father, John Kani in the upcoming locally produced movie ‘The Suit’ #Dstv872 pic.twitter.com/kIs7TA84kL— TransAfricaRadio (@TransAfrica872) March 9, 2016The short film version of Can Themba’s classic South African story, The Suit, has been written for screen and directed by fledgling filmmaker Jarryd Coetsee. The film stars Atandwa Kani, son of South African acting legend John Kani, in the lead role of Philemon.The story, set in 1950s apartheid South Africa, deals with the consequences of an extramarital affair gone wrong, but the metaphor acts as a more substantial comment on the brutal effects of the forced removals of the time. The story was banned by the National Party government when it was first published, but has since become a standard in high school set work curriculums; it has also been adapted for stage.Themba was a journalist for Drum magazine and an apartheid dissident. He died in exile in 1968.About his debut film, Coetsee, who first read the novel as a set work at school, told the South African Sunday Times newspaper that the story was still important. Its themes of personal space and humiliation offered a more emotional understanding today of the profound trauma experienced by millions of South Africans during apartheid.In the story, Philemon discovers a suit left by the lover of his wife, Matilda. He proceeds to use the suit to torment and humiliate her.“Oppression is cyclical and it affects personal relationships in a destructive way,” said Coetsee. “I can think of no time in our history when it has been more urgent to heed Themba’s cautionary tale because we are now at great risk of oppressive forces derailing our progress.”Watch the trailer belowThe Suit also stars Phuti Nakene as Matilda and John Kani in a small, supporting role.The film has been selected for the Zanzibar and Durban film festivals, with Coetsee and Kani hoping that word of mouth and some critical success might lead to it being shown at other international short film festivals over the next year.While it might only be in short-film format, no expense has been spared in recreating the era, offering a visual quality worthy of any feature-length production, thanks to Coetsee and his team at Mandala Films.He hopes that success for The Suit will spur on more short film narratives that will celebrate local stories, both old and new.Source: Times Livelast_img read more

Tech Gifts For Every Mom in Your Life—For Under $100

first_imgHow to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? When she doesn’t want to have to lug around a purse, this Fossil phone wallet ($55) is a great option. It fits most smartphones and other essentials like credit cards. The lightweight Withings pulse activity tracker ($100) clips onto Mom’s clothes and measures her steps, distance, elevation, calories, and sleep. It gets bonus points for syncing data wirelessly to iOS or Android phones with the free app. More stories from PopSugar Tech:11 Ways to Have the Coolest (Geeky) House on the BlockA Guide to Hashtags, Every Day of the WeekThe Only Apps You Need For the Best Cinco de Mayo EverThe Jurassic Park Score — Now in Epic Vinyl!Doodle 4 Google Makes Students the Inventors of a Better World The app-enabled Proximo Monitoring System lets her know where valuables are at all times. The starter kit ($60) includes one fob that alerts her when she’s left her phone behind and a tag to locate her personal items (keys, purse, etc.).  What’s better than sleek, practical headphones? A set ($77, originally $91) made from reinforced fiberglass that’ll withstand any damage and that comes with a microphone so Mom can hold all her convos in peace. Belkin‘s CarAudio Connect FM ($100) Bluetooth-enabled accessory connects smartphones to car stereos in seconds. Just pair the phone via Bluetooth, plug the accessory into a cigarette lighter, and voilà — mom can make hands-free calls or play music from a playlist through her car speakers.  This unique, handcrafted cherry wood stand ($55) for iPad and iPad Mini brings some natural beauty into Mom’s digital world. Check out the natural wood ($25) stand for iPhones too.  The new Kindle Paperwhite ($99) boasts improvements that moms will certainly appreciate. We’re talking a lightweight body, battery life that lasts weeks, and a built-in light. 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Amazon Prime ($99 per year) is an online shopper’s best friend. She’ll get free two-day shipping on most items, complete access to Prime Instant Videos, one-click purchasing, and the ability to borrow hundreds of books from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library. This is the ultimate accessory for setting up a mobile office anywhere, at anytime. Turn an iPad into a workstation with Belkin‘s folio and keyboard for iPad 2, 3, and 4 ($100). The keyboard is removable, and the slim design eliminates bulk.  Not only is this slouchy vegan tote ($68) one of the prettiest bags out there, but it features a large removable zipper pouch to keep her laptop or tablet. Plus, it comes in different colors for every mom’s taste! So chic! This Python-embossed iPad Mini case ($88, originally $125) can be personalized with Mom’s initials so it’s uniquely hers. Tags:#mothers day#PopSugarTech#tech gifts lisette mejia Mom, more than most people, needs multiple chargers. Give her some battery power no matter where she is with this supercute kit ($24).  Editor’s note: This post was originally published by our partners at PopSugar Tech.If you liked Mother’s Day gifts under $50 but wanted to up the ante, consider one of these tech gifts for under $100. From chic totes to monitoring systems, you’ll find something for your mom, your aunt, grandma, and your sister. They deserve the best, after all! Why You Love Online Quizzes May 2 is the last day to order iPhoto Print Products ($4-$50) if you want to give her iPhoto books and calendars on Mother’s Day proper. Create beautiful memories of vacations or family outings for Mom, or a year full of family photos in iPhoto.  Related Posts Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

Eliud Kipchoge can break world marathon record again, predicts coach

first_img London Marathon: Eliud Kipchoge and Brigid Kosgei win men and women’s elite races Eliud Kipchoge can break his own world record again after producing “one of his best ever performances” at the London Marathon, his coach, Patrick Sang, has predicted.“I talked to people before the race and some were asking what Eliud still had,” Sang told the Guardian. “I told them he still had a lot of potential to run even faster. Given the wind wasn’t great, and all the circumstances around the race, the guy showed us he was able to control and deliver. I think he can break the world record again.” Photograph: Chesnot/Getty Images Europe Show Read more Reuse this content The 36-year-old Farah is yet to decide whether to run the 10,000m or marathon at the world championships in Doha, although he would want at least one track race as preparation if he picks the shorter option, making the Anniversary Games a logical target. Share via Email Share on Twitter London Marathon Hide Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. Share on LinkedIn Read more Was this helpful? Mo Farah regrets Haile Gebrselassie row but sticks ‘by every word I said’ Support The Guardian Thank you for your feedback. Tackling the 10,000m in Doha would give him the additional advantage of fitting in a lucrative big city autumn marathon, too. And while New York in November has long been mooted as the most likely option, an audacious October double of running the 10,000m in Doha on 6 October before defending his Chicago Marathon title a week later is not out of the question. Another option would be to miss the world championships completely and run the Berlin Marathon in September instead.Berlin has the advantage of being a lightning quick course, although Lough believes Farah was capable of running high 2:03s on Sunday – rather than the 2:05.39 he finished on – and insists that the marathon at next year’s Tokyo Olympics is very much the plan.“I think in this type of race, Kipchoge is head and shoulders above,” Lough added. “But a championship race is totally different. There’s no pacemakers, there’s the championship pressure, the conditions out in Tokyo for the Olympics. The marathon there is still very much the goal.” Share on Pinterest Athletics Share on Messenger news Topics Quick guide Follow Guardian sport on social media Share on WhatsApp Twitter: follow us at @guardian_sportFacebook: like our football and sport pagesInstagram: our favourite photos, films and storiesYouTube: subscribe to our football and sport channels Sang admitted that Nike’s controversial new Next% shoes, which are said to improve running economy by 5% over standard running trainers, had also given Kipchoge a “psychological boost”. However he insisted it was the 34-year-old Kenyan’s ability and mental strength that provided his biggest advantage – and enabled him to run a world record 2hr 01min 39sec last September. “We can never understand the capacity of what a human mind can do,” he added. Kipchoge’s winning time was 2:02.37 on Sunday.Mo Farah, meanwhile, has refused to rule out a return to the track for the first time in two years at the Anniversary Games in July. Farah was non-committal when asked about rumours swirling around the London Marathon, saying, “Maybe – I don’t know”, while his coach, Gary Lough, stressed that no decision had been made. “There’s lots of moving parts,” he added. Since you’re here… Share on Facebook … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.last_img read more

Photo: Florida Signee Jordan Scarlett Gets Awesome Gators Tattoo

first_imgA Florida Gators player running on the field with a Florida Gators flag.LEXINGTON, KY – SEPTEMBER 23: Chauncey Gardner Jr #23 of the Florida Gators celebrates after the 28-27 win over the Kentucky Wildcats at Kroger Field on September 23, 2017 in Lexington, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)Florida signee Jordan Scarlett hasn’t played a down for his team just yet, but it looks like he’s going to be a Gator for life – whether or not he actually sticks with the program. Scarlett, a four-star running back commit who begins his freshman year in 2015, got a very strong Florida tattoo earlier this week. It’s of the school logo, which features mascot Albert.Go follow @thaillustratedman305 on Instagram thanks for the ink! pic.twitter.com/RI7hJT2CiH— ManChild (@Famousscarlett) April 7, 2015Scarlett is expected to be a big asset for a program looking to get back on the map. It looks like he’s ready to go.[Only Gators]last_img read more