Tag: 杭州417龙凤

Chelsea v West Brom: Fabregas starts

first_imgCesc Fabregas starts for Chelsea against West Brom after recovering from a hamstring problem, while Willian is also in the side. Ramires is among the Blues substitutes, as is the fit-again Andre Schurrle.For Albion, Craig Gardner returns from suspension but Jonas Olsson and Sebastien Pocognoli are out injured.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Matic, Fabregas; Willian, Oscar, Hazard; Costa.Subs: Cech, Zouma, Filipe Luis, Ramires, Schurrle, Drogba, Remy. West Brom: Foster, Wisdom, Dawson, Lescott, Yacob, Baird, Gardner, Brunt, Dorrans, Sessegnon, Berahino.Subs: Myhill, Gamboa, McAuley, Morrison, Anichebe, Samaras, Ideye.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Brentford reject West Ham bid for Hogan

first_imgBrentford have rejected an offer of £10m from West Ham for striker Scott Hogan.The Hammers’ bid comes after Premier League rivals Watford also made an enquiry about the 24-year-old’s availability.Although the Hornets have not tabled a formal offer, they are one of a number of clubs to show an interest in him.Reading have had a bid rejected, while Newcastle and Aston Villa have also previously been linked with Hogan, who has 14 Championship goals to his name this season.His former club Rochdale would get a slice of any transfer fee if Brentford – who valued him at around £15m – choose to sell.Hogan has 18 months of his contract at Griffin Park remaining. See also:Hogan might be rested for Bees cup tie  Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Fossilization Requires Special Conditions

first_imgA science writer wrote a semi-amusing account on how to become a fossil.  In so doing, he pointed out that fossilization is a very rare fate for most organisms.Writing for National Geographic, freelance science writer and evolutionist Brian Switek quipped, “Pick your burial spot carefully if you want future paleontologists to find you.”  For those needing “Tips on How to Become a Fossil,” this article is for you.  (First tip is not to use a coffin.)Switek pondered this question when finding a footprint in a national park and wondering, “When I die, will I leave any traces behind in the fossil record?”  The chances of being preserved are slim, considering the combination of accidents that have to occur and hazards to be avoided.  (Note: the study of fossilization processes is called taphonomy.)  Here are your choices, summarized from the article:Sedimentary rock: get buried quickly.  “The sooner I can be buried by sediment and kept safe from the various organisms that decay a body after death, the better.”  Even that, though, won’t prevent the “ecological recyclers” (bacteria, fungi, burrowing insects, plant roots) from erasing all memory of your existence.  And if you survive them, your traces could be scattered by floods or other geological forces.The deep blue sea:  prepare to be fish food.  “After sharks and crabs had their fill, my bones might become home for bone-eating snot-flower worms that rely on the skeletons of whales and other benthic bonanzas to carry out their peculiar life cycles.”  Don’t count on recognizable remains.Desert decay:  prepare to be insect food.  “My drying corpse might become home to beetles and other insects that burrow in bones, their circuitous pathways permanently recorded in my skeleton.”  Unless buried quickly though, bones decay in the desert heat.Volcanic ash:  good luck.  Fine-grained volcanic ash has preserved some of the best fossils, like those in China.  Switek jokes that his favorite T-shirt would not be fossilized, though.  It says, “Future Transitional Fossil.“Muck:  good luck.  The exquisite detail in Archaeopteryx came from its burial in oxygen-depleted muck from an ancient lagoon, Switek says.His last paragraph underscores the rarity of fossilization of any animal:But even a perfect burial doesn’t guarantee discovery. In the millions of years of Earth history that lie ahead, oceans and mountains will rise and fall, and the continents will shift. Should my remains actually become a part of the fossil record, they may rest in a place wholly inaccessible to any future explorers. Even if I come to my final rest at an accessible spot on the surface, erosion might expose and destroy what’s left of me. Or there may not be any future explorers to find me. This is why the discovery of any fossil is a joyous occasion. In the face of so much destructive potential, a fragment of the past has survived and at long last been found.It’s interesting to ponder whether the late Harry Truman (not the President, but the lodge owner at Spirit Lake, Mt. St. Helens) became fossilized after being buried instantly in volcanic ash on May 18, 1980.  Even if he did, the chances of ever finding his remains are slim to none.It was nice of Brian to point out how rare fossilization is.  Very special conditions are required.  Those conditions were ideal during the Genesis Flood – an explanation that Switek (as evolutionary moyboy) is guaranteed to mock.  He doesn’t have to wait to become a “future transitional form” (where is his company?).  According to God’s word, because he refuses to acknowledge the clear evidence for creation all around him, he is already a transitional form between Homo sapiens and Homo reprobatus, most likely (because of evident exercise of his brain), at stage 2, “Professing to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22). (Visited 119 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The Mash Up radio host learns from listeners

first_imgPoets and musicians collaborate on The Mash Up, a weekly SAfm radio show. Between them and the audience, they teach the host and listeners about South Africa’s musical history.Naledi Moleo, host of The Mash Up, says the first show was broadcast on 13 August 2016. It was nominated for Best Music show in the 2017 Liberty Radio Awards in April. (Image supplied)Melissa JavanTo learn about South African music from the listeners and the artists in studio is one of the benefits of hosting The Mash Up radio show on SA FM Radio, says Naledi Moleo.“Songs like Jikijela by Letta Mbulu and Naughty Little Flea by Miriam Makeba are songs we would never have sourced and played had it not been for the listeners and artists who have requested real South African classics,” she adds.The Mash Up, explains Moleo, is a weekly hour-long show broadcast on Saturdays. It features live poetry and music by renowned and upcoming South African poets and musicians. “Each week, The Mash Up will bring together a poet and a musician. Through interviews, live poetry and music performances, they collaborate by ‘mashing up’ their respective crafts.”The artists may also give a selection of their favourite South African songs. “The listeners will be introduced to artists from different backgrounds, ages and genres. The show is about nation building and celebrating the extraordinary talent from South Africa.“The listeners love it. I get excited especially when listeners SMS us, giving us names of musicians and poets that we should have on the show,” says Moleo.How it startedShe realised there was a major opportunity to create a platform for South African poets, says Moleo. “Poetry has the power to either make really difficult conversations more palatable or raise our awareness of injustices. More than anything, poetry can also just uplift and renew us.“I believe that South Africans really need that in this day and age. We are bombarded with so much bad news and pressure that it is necessary to reflect. I too am in need of therapy that the live music and poetry offer at the end of every long week.”It is just magical, she says, to watch two artists who have never collaborated forced to make it work live on air — they have no prior preparation. “They always come into the studio feeling completely nervous and leave on cloud nine because they are so proud of themselves.“South Africa has always been a country that enjoys music and poetry. Think of how we sing with every major event. Think of the praise poetry and official events and even traditional weddings. The Mash Up is just a reflection of how South Africans have always expressed themselves. As a talk radio host all I really am interested in is hearing those different forms of self-expression.”The collaborationsMoleo says the musicians are usually the underdogs in the industry. “Artists like Nono Nkoane, Msaki and Tribute Birdie Mboweni are immensely talented and underrated. We think it’s important to celebrate their work.“Every now and then we will also have some of the legends of the music industry. Maestros such as Lex Futshane, Vusi Mahlasela and Pops Mohamed have also graced our studio and it’s wonderful because we get to celebrate their wonderful work and share with a younger listener who perhaps hasn’t had the opportunity to interact with their work.”One of the collaborations was Tshepo Molefe and Sabelo Mthembu.#TheMashUp with @naledimoleo brings you poet @tshepomolefe942 and musician @sabelomthembu. Expect an hour of awesome live poetry and music pic.twitter.com/YtmwB6mhL3— SAfmRadio ? (@SAfmRadio) June 24, 2017#TheMashUp thanks so much to our guests this evening the phenomenal @sabelomthembu and wordsmith @tshepomolefe942 @naledimoleo pic.twitter.com/6Fdk60HnfO— SAfmRadio ? (@SAfmRadio) June 24, 2017Molefe has been writing poetry for two years. “It began when I was still a student at [the University of the Witwatersrand] and I entered a poetry competition called DFL Lover + Another. There, I met a poet who goes by the name NoLiFE [or Nobody Lives ForEver] and he introduced me to a platform called Cuddle Sessions. This in turn introduced me to the Joburg poetry scene. I haven’t looked back.”According to Molefe his poetry ranges from social issues, such as alcohol abuse and miscarriage from a father’s perspective, to political commentary to his own struggles and the problems he has with his family.He describes his experience on The Mash Up as amazing.Molefe believes collaborations such as these build a better and more versatile network between artists. “What I mean by ‘more versatile network between artists’ is often we get caught up our own artistic spaces, for instance I would normally stay in and interact with my poetry circles, and not know of other creative spaces that are out there.“Such spaces would include soul singers and instrumentalists. The Mash Up kind of collaborations opens doors for artists in different fields to first know that they exist and if they would someday want to work on a joint project, provided that they like each other’s work.”Musician Mthembu agrees: “I truly enjoyed it. I wasn’t sure what to expect. But the vibe between the poet and I was great. It was the first time I collaborated with a poet.“There was an instant gel of styles.”He says collaborations teach him that artists need each other to grow. “Working together we have the capacity to achieve more as a people.”Mthembu has been in the music industry for about 10 years. “I did backing vocals for Louise Carver for about five years before releasing my solo project.”He says although he started singing in church when he was five years old, singing was not a first career choice growing up. “I enjoyed doing it very much though. It was only after participating on South Africa’s Idols in 2007 that I decided to pursue it more aggressively.Besides Carver, he has contributed backing vocals on various artists’ projects. He calls his music “Afrosoul with a touch of jazz and classical music”.You can listen to the podcasts of The Mash Up here.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? 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Grower organizations encourage manufacturers to implement AgGateway’s ADAPT for precision ag

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A dozen leading U.S. grower organizations are hailing the collaborative efforts that led to the new AgGateway ADAPT framework for interoperability in precision ag systems – citing the many benefits to farmers, and are calling on Farm Management Information System (FMIS) companies to formally commit to integrating the ADAPT framework into their systems in the near future.The support was expressed in a letter this month to AgGateway Chairman David Black from the American Farm Bureau Federation, American Soybean Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Barley Growers Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Cotton Council, National Farmers Union, National Sorghum Producers, National Sunflower Association, U.S. Canola Association, U.S. Dry Bean Council, and USA Rice.“Over the last decade, the most consistent concern raised by farmers using precision ag is that ‘different systems won’t work together,’” the letter states. “The farm and commodity groups are pleased that AgGateway member companies worked collectively to solve this problem by creating ADAPT…. As organizations representing producers of all commodities and in all 50 states, we offer our support to encourage FMIS companies to formally commit to integrating the ADAPT framework in the near future.“We are grateful for this truly impressive show of support from grower organizations, and are ready to assist companies — and get their feedback to continually improve ADAPT — as they incorporate this technology into their proprietary systems,” said Mark Stelford, Chairman of AgGateway’s ADAPT Oversight Committee and General Manager of Premier Crop Systems.As AgGateway’s ADAPT is integrated into products, the grower will be much better equipped to manage data across different precision agriculture systems, regardless of the system manufacturer. ADAPT is an open source project, allowing precision ag software providers globally to use the software and to contribute to its continued development. The ADAPT framework is comprised of an Agricultural Application Data Model, a common API (Application Programming Interface), and a combination of open source and proprietary data conversion plug-ins. Developers can access additional information about the ADAPT SDK, as well as access the model, by going to www.ADAPTframework.org.“ADAPT and the accompanying data format enables the interoperability between software systems, service providers and advisors that farmers need to perform their routine operations more efficiently and seamlessly,” said Tarak Reddy, Chair of AgGateway’s ADAPT Technical Committee and Delivery Architect of John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group.Companies that have committed to using ADAPT and releasing plug-ins for many of their proprietary data formats currently include AGCO Corporation, Ag Leader Technology, CLAAS, CNH Industrial, Deere & Company, Praxidyn, Raven Industries, Topcon Precision Agriculture, and Trimble Navigation. The “plug-in” technology allows the ADAPT platform to work with individual, proprietary products.The AgGateway team publicly released the open-source ADAPT — which stands for Agricultural Data Application Programming Toolkit — in February. The timeline for plug-in development will vary by manufacturer this fall and into 2017; some plug-ins are immediately available to FMIS companies, who can check with the manufacturer for availability and licensing details. At the same time, AgGateway members have developed an ISO plug-in to support a broad range of ISO-compatible systems under an open source license.Companies currently participating in AgGateway’s ADAPT Oversight Committee include Ag Connections, Ag Leader, AGCO, Agrian, CNH Industrial, Central Valley Ag Coop, CLAAS, Conservis, Independent Data Management, John Deere, Land O’ Lakes, Monsanto, Premier Crop Systems, ProAg, Raven Industries, Software Solutions Integrated, SST Software, Syngenta, Topcon Precision Agriculture, Trimble, Uptake and ZedX. For more information and to join the work of the committee, contact the committee at [email protected] addition, the ADAPT Oversight Committee met at the AgGateway Annual Conference November 7-10 in Orlando. More details can be found at www.AgGateway.org.last_img read more