Tag: 爱上海V

Memphis Soul Outfit Southern Avenue To Play Tipitina’s In NOLA

first_imgGritty soul outfit Southern Avenue, made up of powerful sisterly duo of Tierinii and Tikyra Jackson on vocals and drums, respectively, along with Israeli-born blues guitarist Ori Naftaly, bassist Daniel McKee, and keyboardist Jeremy Powell, have been earning their stripes out on the road for the last year. On Saturday night, April 1st, the group will return to New Orleans for a show at legendary venue Tipitina’s with special guests Wonderland.While Southern Avenue has only been together for a little over a year, they have already made their mark on the Beale Street crowd in Memphis and beyond. With appearances on their self-titled debut album from the likes of guitarist Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars) and trumpeter Mark Franklin (The Bo-Keys), Southern Avenue is making a clear case for their ascension in the rock world.The group came together when Israeli-born guitarist Ori Naftaly met singer Tierinii Jackson; the two had an instant musical connection. According to Ori, “When I saw Tierinii perform, I thought, ‘This is why I came to America.’ I met her and we clicked. At our first rehearsal, she told me that her sister was a drummer, and she thought it would be great to have her in the band. We had such a good vibe, and suddenly I didn’t care so much about my solo thing.” And the rest, as they say, is history.Purchase tickets for the show here. For additional show information, check out the Facebook Event page here.last_img read more

A call for action, and for hope

first_imgWarning that the world is over-armed and peace underfunded, that billions of people live in deplorable conditions, that climate change is happening fast, and that racism, discrimination against women, and genocide are huge problems worldwide, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday urged Harvard faculty and students to continue research on these global problems and use what they learn to help improve conditions around the world.“A Harvard education is a tremendous gift,” he said. “The world needs you to use what you acquire here, not to perpetuate the status quo, but to be part of the transformation the world so urgently needs,” he told an overflow crowd of more than 1,000 in Memorial Church.Ban was on campus to receive the 2014 Harvard Humanitarian of the Year award. “The United Nations is a ship of hope, and Ban Ki-moon is the captain of this ship,” said S. Allen Counter, director of the Harvard Foundation, in presenting the award. “He has faced tough challenges with courage and prudence.”Sandra Naddaff, director of undergraduate studies, senior lecturer in comparative literature, and dean of Harvard Summer School, joined students Jiwon Kim of the Harvard Korean Association and Kirin Gupta of the Harvard Foundation in paying tribute to Ban. Harvard President Emeritus Derek C. Bok provided welcoming remarks.Mindful that students are in the middle of exam period, Ban wished them luck, and added, “You are not the only ones being tested at this time. People ask me quite often these days: ‘Why is the world facing so many crises at once? What is going wrong?’” He then presented his plans, working with U.N. member nations and partners around the world, to address such problems. They include the 15-year, eight-point Millennium Development Goals “to reduce extreme poverty and hunger; get children, especially girls, in school; ensure access to water and sanitation; improve the health of mothers and children, fight disease and protect the environment, all by the end of 2015. The gains have been remarkable,” he said, “but there is a long way to go.” He said U.N. members are working on plans to tackle these problems that “will take us to 2030.”Ban also talked about the scourge of Ebola. Hard-won progress for peace, human rights, and economic development in countries like Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea are “imperiled by the outbreak,” he said. “All three countries are now struggling to contain a complex crisis.” He added, “Over the years, Harvard’s scientists have helped the world to understand the virus. I urge you to continue your pioneering research efforts to understand this virus — and others for which we have neither vaccines nor cures.”On the problem of climate change and the threat of nuclear arms, Ban said nuclear weapons are poised to do great harm to the environment. “Nuclear weapons cannot be used without jeopardizing civilians. Even a limited or regional nuclear war can alter our climate and produce famine conditions“Let us … take our cue from Harvard’s own Professor John Holdren, now serving as President Obama’s science adviser,” who said 19 years ago, “‘Either we will achieve an environmentally sustainable prosperity for all, in a world where weapons of mass destruction have disappeared or become irrelevant, or we will all suffer from the chaos, conflict and destruction resulting from the failure to achieve this.’“I encourage Harvard to be an even bigger part of the transition to a safer, healthier, low-carbon future,” Ban said.Turning to Counter, Ban said, “Let me congratulate you for your long-standing efforts to promote harmony among the many communities at Harvard. People today are more connected than ever before. At its best, this process of interaction leads to interdependence and a recognition of our common humanity.”Addressing the Memorial Church audience, he said, “We cannot ward off earthquakes and other natural disasters. But man-made ills are entirely within our power to prevent. A sustainable world of freedom and dignity for all is entirely within our power to build. I look forward to the imprint you will make in advancing the common good.”last_img read more

Wireless coverage constantly a concern

first_imgFew students would disagree that USC’s wireless Internet service is due for some fine-tuning, but they might not realize the amount of work and money required to improve wireless coverage.Connect · Students studying in Leavey Library take advantage of the improved wireless coverage in the library and surrounding area. – Vicki Yang | Daily Trojan In 2006, Information Technology Services began working to improve its wireless coverage, which had been in place since 2002. ITS added almost 1,000 wireless Internet access points to the pre-existing 620, increasing coverage roughly 160 percent.But those improvements have not satisfied USC students. In fact, every candidate in the recent Undergraduate Student Government election mentioned improving wireless as one of his or her platform points.“We’ve had enough student feedback to know that there’s an issue, and I think it’s why you saw candidates talking about it in the student government campaigns,” said John Baldo, director of university affairs for USG. “I think everyone kind of agrees it is something we should have. I think ITS is pretty onboard with making sure we have it.”Newly elected USG president Chris Cheng said USG’s focus for next year will shift toward improving wireless in the residence halls, as many students have complained about the spotty coverage.“Before the elections, we had a research period where we talked to as many students as possible,” Cheng said. “There really is a high demand for improvement in the residence halls, and in the core academic buildings — Von KleinSmid and Taper Hall, places where a lot of people have their General Education courses.”Kevin Durkin, director of communications for ITS, said sometimes it is not the number of access points that creates a weak signal but other types of interference, such as microwave ovens or the wire mesh in the walls of buildings.Cheng stressed that USG is not suggesting that ITS isn’t doing its job in providing wireless to students.“But in places where the wireless is weak and low, we want to strengthen it,” he said.Until recently, wireless coverage was inconsistent, even in Leavey Library, a main study spot for both graduate and undergraduate students. Last semester, USG conducted a meticulous survey of Leavey library, measuring signal strength across the building and identifying its weakest points, gathering student feedback and meeting with library staff and ITS Field Services Director Gabe Ochoa.“John Baldo presented a very comprehensive report,” said Hugh McHarg, executive director of communications and public programming for the USC libraries. “And we’re very glad the student government folks engaged in that because Internet access is an important part of the service we provide at the library.”The library agreed to add four new access points, and ITS paid for three more. Each new wireless access point costs $900.“ITS paid for three access points, so we’re very grateful to them for working with us,” Baldo said. “And now we have seven new access points over the second, third and fourth floors [of Leavey], because those are the floors where students are studying the most.”Next, USG will work to improve the wireless available in common outdoor areas, such as McCarthy Quad.“With something like this, you have to start somewhere and sort of focus on one area at a time. You can’t just walk in and say, ‘I want every building next week,’ because there’s this huge cost you have to take into consideration,” Baldo said.Students disagreed as to whether the first step should be improving wireless in the dorms or in common areas.“I don’t know how it is in different residence halls, but I know that mine doesn’t get wireless,” said Robert Peterson, a sophomore majoring in music industry who lives in Parkside International Residential College.Peterson said he thinks improving wireless near the dorms will be an asset to students.Others, however, think wireless in classrooms needs to be the priority.“I think classrooms should come first. From what I see, I don’t see a lot of people using their laptops outside,” said Esmeralda del Rio, an undecided sophomore. “My sociology professor always has a hard time getting wireless on her laptop when she’s about to show slideshows. It takes her about, like, five minutes. And sometimes, when she wants to use the Internet, she can’t.”Kimberly Kanable, a freshman majoring in environmental engineering, said she thinks it makes sense to start with classrooms and common spaces, as Ethernet connections are available in the residence halls. Baldo said the biggest problem in attempting to improve wireless coverage in any given building is figuring out who is going to cover the cost.“You know everyone wants perfect wireless in their building, so you can imagine ITS is trying to accommodate what everyone wants, but it’s not really possible when it’s $900 an access point,” Baldo said.Durkin emphasized ITS is committed to providing the campus with the wireless coverage it increasingly needs.“ITS recognizes that the increased use of mobile devices — laptops, iPhones, Blackberries and so forth — is driving the demand for improved wireless service, so in response to that we are looking for alternative approaches to providing pervasive, reliable wireless coverage across both campuses. So in other words, stay tuned,” Durkin said.last_img read more