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Tears for Chloe Kinsella

first_imgEmail Advertisement Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ WhatsApp Facebook By KATHRYN HAYESTHERE were tearful scenes as hundreds of mourners, mostly teenage girls gathered in Limerick last Sunday night for the removal of tragic Chloe Kinsella, whose body was recovered from the river Shannon.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Most of those crowded outside Crosses funeral home on Lower Gerald Griffin Street had taken part in the six day search for the popular 15- year-old who went missing from her home over a week ago.Divers from Limerick Marine Search and Rescue recovered Chloe’s body from the river just a short distance from her home in Kenyon Avenue, Kileely last Friday.Gardai are not treating her death as suspicious.Scores of teenage girls mostly wearing pink walked the sorrowful journey, behind the funeral cortege to St Munchin’s Church in Thomondgate led by Chloe’s heartbroken parents Shirley and Kevin.“The girls all decided to wear pink for Chloe,” said one mourner.The 15-year-old’s love of fashion and make up was incapsulated in many of the floral tributes adorning her large white casket.Personal tributes including a make up kit, a floral wreath incorporating a smartphone, and a life sized poster of the boy band One Direction were also in the cortege.Among the largest floral tributes resting against the casket was a collage of photographs of Chloe and her friends with a message ‘Best Friends Forever’.The youngest daughter in a family of nine children this is not the first time that tragedy has visited the Kinsella family.In 2004 Chloe’s younger sister Sophie died from a heart illness aged just four.Shortly after Chloe’s body was found her Uncle Matthew Franklin issued a heartfelt plea to all young people to respect life and seek help if they need it.Mr Franklin is due to speak on behalf of the Kinsella’s family at today’s funeral mass at St Munchin’s Church.The chief celebrant Reverend Pat Seaver is also expected to direct his sermon towards young mourners in particular Chloe’s class mates from fifth year in St Nessan’s School and her many friends from the locality.Meanwhile, Limerick TD Willie O’Dea who was also among the mourners has called on the government to “focus on suicide…as a matter of urgency”.Deputy O’Dea also criticised his own party on its record on mental health.“I tell you the last government should equally be criticised with the present government. Both governments spent money on mental health, but I think they spent it in the wrong way. They spent it with the wrong focus.”“It’s an absolute disgrace, that we are spending so much money and the problem seems to be getting worse and worse and worse.”He added: “Too many young families have been bereaved (by suicide). I’ve attended too may funerals like this. I’ve sympathised with too many families, like the unfortunate family inside there (funeral home) with their fifteen-year old daughter in there in a coffin. I’m not sure that money is being spent the best way possible.”Deputy O’Dea called for a more direct way of getting funding to groups helping vulnerable people without the money being “swallowed up in administration”. Twitter TAGSchloe KinsellafeaturedMusic Limerick No vaccines in Limerick yet center_img Previous articleKiller and rapist jailed for laneway robberyNext articleLimerick County Hurling Final Action admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsCommunityLocal NewsTears for Chloe KinsellaBy admin – October 7, 2013 777 #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Linkedin Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Printlast_img read more

From pups to pythons – ISPCA Donegal centre helps over 200 animals in first year

first_imgThe ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre (ARC) is celebrating the first anniversary of the opening of the state-of-the-art-facility in Ramelton.The new centre has already cared for 233 animals since it opened on 20th June 2018.The centre is going from strength to strength, with two full time members of staff who care for and rehabilitate animals in need. ISPCA Centre Manager, Denise McCausland, said: “We’re pleased with how the first year at the centre has gone. It has been a busy twelve months caring for and rehabilitating 67 dogs and puppies, 144 cats and kittens, 6 ponies and donkeys and we have also helped various wildlife casualties including, a swan, a duck, two hedgehogs, one of which was trapped in a drain and was later released following veterinary treatment.“140 animals have already been adopted from the centre, 59 animals are getting ready to start their new lives and we have more animals in our care undergoing treatment and rehabilitation including an orphaned baby hedgehog (hoglet) and starling which are currently being hand reared.”October 2018: Hans the Hedgehog recovers after his rescue from a drain at the ISPCA Donegal ARCPhoto: ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation CentreISPCA Senior Inspector Kevin McGinley said: “The ISPCA Donegal ARC is the first animal rehabilitation centre of its kind in Donegal and has already helped so many animals. The majority of the animals I have rescued were victims of neglect and abuse and many others were injured and in need of veterinary care.  Once they are brought into the centre they are cared for, rehabilitated and then responsibly rehomed.”ISPCA Senior Inspector Kevin McGinleyKevin added: “No two days are the same in my job.  I could be responding to a horrific case of animal neglect and later be assisting the local Gardaí and wildlife rangers to locate a royal python on the loose, which happened recently. We are receiving a lot of calls about cats and kittens and our cattery is full to capacity.  We are treating a lot of sick and unwanted kittens which could have been prevented if owners had neutered or spayed their cats. “In most cases, spaying and neutering has overwhelmingly positive health benefits and it also prevents accidental litters of kittens or puppies which can also be challenging in finding good homes. Pet owners need to play their part by spaying and neutering their pets and this will massively help in preventing unwanted litters in the first place. We are asking to public to ask their vets for advice and do the right thing for their pets”.ISPCA Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre Manager Denise McCauslandDenise said:  “The Donegal ARC is going from strength to strength and this has only been made possible with the kind help of our local supporters who have made donations, fostered an animal or volunteered their time. It costs over €100,000 annually to run the centre, including two full time members of staff who care for and rehabilitate the animals in our care. These costs don’t include the local ISPCA Inspector.  Donations, no matter how big or small, are really appreciated so we can continue our work – donations can be made online https://www.ispca.ie/donate/ ”.The ISPCA is always looking for volunteers who can help out. The ISPCA has a number of volunteer roles available to work hands-on with the animals in our cattery, kennels and stables. They are also looking for grounds keeping and maintenance volunteers, and people to help out at various events, or to do some fundraising!To become an ISPCA volunteer, you must be over 16 years of age for insurance purposes. Visit the website for more information about volunteer opportunities here https://www.ispca.ie/volunteer/The ISPCA is asking the public to continue to report animal cruelty to the ISPCA National Animal Cruelty Helpline in confidence on 1890 515 515, email [email protected] or report online herehttps://www.ispca.ie/cruelty_complaint From pups to pythons – ISPCA Donegal centre helps over 200 animals in first year was last modified: June 20th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal Animal Rehabilitation Centre (ARC)ISPCAlast_img read more

Fossilization Requires Special Conditions

first_imgA science writer wrote a semi-amusing account on how to become a fossil.  In so doing, he pointed out that fossilization is a very rare fate for most organisms.Writing for National Geographic, freelance science writer and evolutionist Brian Switek quipped, “Pick your burial spot carefully if you want future paleontologists to find you.”  For those needing “Tips on How to Become a Fossil,” this article is for you.  (First tip is not to use a coffin.)Switek pondered this question when finding a footprint in a national park and wondering, “When I die, will I leave any traces behind in the fossil record?”  The chances of being preserved are slim, considering the combination of accidents that have to occur and hazards to be avoided.  (Note: the study of fossilization processes is called taphonomy.)  Here are your choices, summarized from the article:Sedimentary rock: get buried quickly.  “The sooner I can be buried by sediment and kept safe from the various organisms that decay a body after death, the better.”  Even that, though, won’t prevent the “ecological recyclers” (bacteria, fungi, burrowing insects, plant roots) from erasing all memory of your existence.  And if you survive them, your traces could be scattered by floods or other geological forces.The deep blue sea:  prepare to be fish food.  “After sharks and crabs had their fill, my bones might become home for bone-eating snot-flower worms that rely on the skeletons of whales and other benthic bonanzas to carry out their peculiar life cycles.”  Don’t count on recognizable remains.Desert decay:  prepare to be insect food.  “My drying corpse might become home to beetles and other insects that burrow in bones, their circuitous pathways permanently recorded in my skeleton.”  Unless buried quickly though, bones decay in the desert heat.Volcanic ash:  good luck.  Fine-grained volcanic ash has preserved some of the best fossils, like those in China.  Switek jokes that his favorite T-shirt would not be fossilized, though.  It says, “Future Transitional Fossil.“Muck:  good luck.  The exquisite detail in Archaeopteryx came from its burial in oxygen-depleted muck from an ancient lagoon, Switek says.His last paragraph underscores the rarity of fossilization of any animal:But even a perfect burial doesn’t guarantee discovery. In the millions of years of Earth history that lie ahead, oceans and mountains will rise and fall, and the continents will shift. Should my remains actually become a part of the fossil record, they may rest in a place wholly inaccessible to any future explorers. Even if I come to my final rest at an accessible spot on the surface, erosion might expose and destroy what’s left of me. Or there may not be any future explorers to find me. This is why the discovery of any fossil is a joyous occasion. In the face of so much destructive potential, a fragment of the past has survived and at long last been found.It’s interesting to ponder whether the late Harry Truman (not the President, but the lodge owner at Spirit Lake, Mt. St. Helens) became fossilized after being buried instantly in volcanic ash on May 18, 1980.  Even if he did, the chances of ever finding his remains are slim to none.It was nice of Brian to point out how rare fossilization is.  Very special conditions are required.  Those conditions were ideal during the Genesis Flood – an explanation that Switek (as evolutionary moyboy) is guaranteed to mock.  He doesn’t have to wait to become a “future transitional form” (where is his company?).  According to God’s word, because he refuses to acknowledge the clear evidence for creation all around him, he is already a transitional form between Homo sapiens and Homo reprobatus, most likely (because of evident exercise of his brain), at stage 2, “Professing to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22). (Visited 119 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA’s emerging farmers on the rise

first_imgIncreased earnings, better life The programme has made a huge difference to the income and overall social status of the farmers, adds de Beer. The rand value for the area’s 2010/11 season is estimated at almost 70-million (US$8.9-million), of which 90% is earmarked for export. The genetic improvement aspect has also brought about significant change to the quality of the wool produced in the area. With help from the NWGA, farmers from areas bordering the Ciskei and Transkei have gradually been building up the genetic quality of the local herds with superior breeding rams. To date, almost 28 000 rams have been introduced into local herds over a nine-year period. Partnering with emerging farmers Far removed from the rolling green hills of the beautiful Transkei and Ciskei, lies the Hantam district of the Great Karoo, a semi-arid farming area in the Northern Cape, known for its delicious mutton. It is here that farmer Gawie van Wyk and his brother-in-law Jannie van Heerden set up the Jagpan Vennootskap Boerdery in 2007, a mentorship project with emerging farmers. “Our motivation was to make a contribution, to do something to help. I grew up in the area and know the people very well,” says Van Wyk, who is also NWGA’s production adviser in the district. Located 120km from the small town of Carnarvon, the initiative has already won accolades from the Rural Development and Land Reform Department for its financial systems. “We lay great emphasis on the financial management of the farm,” says Van Wyk. Van Wyk and Van Heerden are mentoring four famers – Patrick Sacco, Jan Moolman, Dirk Sacco and Ismael Louw. Three of the group have never farmed commercially before, and for the moment all of them are still part-time farmers. With the exception of Louw, the others still hold down nine to five jobs during the week, with farming activities restricted to the weekends. A business model that works Jagpan’s business plan is simple and ensures success for all three parties – the state, the emerging farmers and the two mentors. The state has allowed the partners to lease the land for a seven-year period at no cost, but with commitments to manage and maintain it. At the outset of the project four years ago, the state donated 400 Dorper ewes to the initiative. These are locally-bred sheep, developed by cross-breeding the Dorset Horn and Blackhead Persian varieties. The breed is well suited to hot, dry areas and is known as a fast-growing meat producer. The Dorpers were run with 400 ewes belonging to Van Wyk and Van Heerden. The 800 sheep were farmed as a unit with a 50% profit share going to the trainees and 50% going to the two mentors. The emerging farmers are required to build up their own flock to 800 ewes within seven years. As this happens, Van Wyk and Van Heerden gradually reduce their own ewe numbers and their percentage of the profits accordingly. The farm is already running 600 of its own Dorper ewes. It wasn’t all plain sailing, though. After experiencing two excellent years the farmers had a tough season in 2010, losing a lot of sheep to Rift Valley Fever. Van Wyk believes the emerging farmers may not have been able to sustain their efforts were it not for the mentorship and support provided during this difficult period. But he sees a promising future. “By the end of the seven years, they’ll be self-sustaining,” he believes.Transkei and Ciskei The Transkei and Ciskei are two of the four formerly independent homelands created under the apartheid government in the 1970s. The other two homelands were Bophuthatswana and Venda. The Ciskei and Transkei are now part of the Eastern Cape Province. The Transkei boasts some of the most spectacular seascapes in South Africa, many of which remain largely untouched, prompting the use of its other popular name, the Wild Coast. The Wild Coast is a favourite tourist spot for the more adventurous as roads can be sub-standard in places, but awards the visitor with places like the Hole in the Wall and Wavecrest, the southern-most mangrove swamp in the world. Inland, visitors are treated to the sight of soft rolling hills dotted with homesteads still built in traditional fashion, with clay walls and thatch roofs. The area’s inhabitants, the Xhosa people, live mostly off subsistence farming and the local tourism industry. The Ciskei region is home to Bhisho, the capital of the Eastern Cape. The area is poor and most inhabitants exist on subsistence farming. The Ciskei has a small stretch of pristine coastline, offering great opportunities for hiking, such as the rewarding Shipwreck hiking trail, which allows hikers the opportunity to really “rough it”. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. 7 October 2011 South Africa’s black emerging farmers are beginning to find their feet in the tough environment of commercial farming, with success stories being recorded in the Eastern and Northern Cape provinces. The majority of the 17 000 wool sheep farmers living in the former Transkei and Ciskei regions – located to the north and south of the Kei River in the Eastern Cape, respectively – are small farmers, running herds of 20 to 30 sheep on average. On their own, these farmers would struggle to make a sustainable living but thanks to a mentorship and support programme offered by the National Wool Growers Association of South Africa (NWGA), these same farmers are now serious players in the wool export industry. The NWGA’s Training and Development for Communal and Emerging Wool Farmers programme aims to pool resources and establish ongoing mentorship. Started in 1997, it has helped to increase the bale volumes of the region’s farmers from just over 222 000 kilograms in 1997 to a hefty 2.9-million kilograms over the last season. “We teach them everything from shearing their sheep, to classing the wool and packing it properly into bales,” says Leon de Beer, GM at the Port Elizabeth-based NWGA head office. “We also introduce them to wool brokers.” The programme follows a five-tier approach: Providing infrastructure development and upgrading of shearing stations and facilities;Giving ongoing development and training;Mentorship assistance with local, established farmers;Help with all marketing-related aspects; andGenetic improvement of the local herds with the gradual introduction of superior rams.last_img read more