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Faculty of Arts and Sciences will bring up to 40% of undergraduates to campus this fall

first_img Teaching to remain online for 2020-21 Related The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. FAS dean outlines three possible paths to return to residential life Administrators’ concerns include the ongoing threat posed by the coronavirus and the possibility of additional quarantines center_img Six graduate and professional Schools to remain online for fall The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) will bring up to 40 percent of undergraduates to campus for the fall semester, including all first-year students, Harvard announced today.University President Larry Bacow, FAS Edgerley Family Dean Claudine Gay, and Danoff Dean of the College Rakesh Khurana co-authored a message to the FAS community that described the path forward, allowing first-years the opportunity to adjust to college academics and to begin creating connections with faculty and other classmates, while learning on campus in September.The College will address gaps in students’ home learning environments and identify those who need to return to campus to continue to progress academically. Students on campus will move out before Thanksgiving and complete reading and exams periods from home.“Harvard was built for connection, not isolation. Without a vaccine or effective clinical treatments for the virus, we know that no choice that reopens the campus is without risk,” the president and deans wrote. “That said, we have worked closely with leading epidemiologists and medical experts to define an approach that we believe will protect the health and safety of our community, while also protecting our academic enterprise and providing students with the conditions they need to be successful academically.”Should only one cohort return in the spring, priority will be given to seniors. Bacow, Gay, and Khurana lamented that the overall decision would be particularly disappointing for sophomores and juniors who face a year away from campus after shifting to remote learning for half the past spring semester when they moved to learning from home as Harvard quickly de-densified because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In recognition of this difficult situation, the president and deans extended to students who study away from campus for the full academic year the opportunity to return next summer to take two tuition-free courses at Harvard Summer School.“The recent upturn in COVID-19 cases in certain states illustrates the difficulty of making predictions, even well-informed ones, about the evolution of this virus. Given this uncertainty, we determined that our fall plan must enable us to bring back as many students as possible while providing sufficient margin to accommodate an escalation of the prevalence of COVID-19 in our area. Anything less and we could find ourselves again facing the prospect of asking our students to leave, on short notice, prior to the end of the semester,” the leaders wrote.The message provided details on the cost of attendance. Tuition will remain as previously announced. Aided students who do not return to campus will receive a $5,000 remote room and board allowance in their financial aid award each semester to support studying at home. The FAS also has eliminated the fall term-time work expectation for all aided students, given the challenging economy and the public health risks of non-remote work.“We understand that the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the economy have created a number of challenges for families all over the world. Affording your Harvard education should not be one of them,” said Jake Kaufmann, Griffin Director of Financial Aid.  “Harvard’s robust financial aid program and commitment to meeting students’ demonstrated financial need remains as strong as ever.”All returning students and first-years will live in single bedrooms with a shared bathroom, and also learn remotely (as described in a previous announcement).All students living on campus will be required to sign a community compact agreeing to new health measures, which include mandatory video training, daily symptom attestation, viral testing every three days, participation in contract tracing, and standard safety practices such as wearing masks and physical distancing. Students who test positive will be isolated and cared for by medical professionals at Harvard University Health Services, which is preparing quarantine accommodations for up to 250 individuals.Inter-House access to other residences and dining areas, as well as to non-residential Harvard buildings, will be restricted, with the exception of University Health Services. Harvard Athletics has not yet determined a date for reopening recreational facilities. Harvard Library’s physical spaces remain closed. No off-campus visitors will be allowed into student residences, including enrolled Harvard students who are not in residence on campus.The FAS has established and will continuously monitor an index of health factors on campus and in the Boston area that affect campus life. This index will guide administrators to respond immediately and alter residential operations as needed. For example, Harvard University Dining Services will be prepared to transition quickly between touchless food pick-up and more traditional dining operations as circumstances warrant.“Though an undergraduate student may be at relatively low risk of complications associated with COVID-19, for example, their actions can impact the families of dining workers, security guards, House staff, and others who make residential life possible. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences promotes shared responsibility for the health and well-being of our campus community. We are truly in this together,” Bacow, Gay, and Khurana wrote.Fall plans will bring a return to regular grading and an adjustment to scheduling. While classes will begin on Sept. 2, the instructional day will be expanded to accommodate students across global time zones. The deferral deadline for first years has been extended to July 24. For upperclassmen contemplating taking leaves of absence, the College has trained a special team of advisors to help them work through the decision.The Ivy League is expected to announce plans for fall sports competitions and training on July 8, but the message acknowledged that having a limited cohort of students on campus will affect what activities are possible. Plans for creating community and for co-curriculars will be announced later in the summer.Bacow, Gay, and Khurana thanked the more than 100 members of the faculty and administration who served on 11 scenario-planning groups to lay out the fall. The interdisciplinary teams included data scientists, economists, historians, privacy experts, life scientists, and philosophers, “who have worked tirelessly to adapt Harvard to the demands the pandemic has placed on us while maintaining our commitment to academic excellence and inclusion.”Though the message only described plans for fall, it suggested that the three on-campus density scenarios that went into this fall’s planning also would apply to spring: lower, continued medium, and higher. A decision on the makeup of spring semester is expected in early December, when the FAS also expects to announce a delayed start to it.Harvard’s professional Schools have made determinations and announcements about their plans for this fall based on their own unique considerations. Information on each School’s plans can be found here.”last_img read more

Brazzoni: College hoops “unwatchable” because of system, not shot clock

first_imgThe long NBA season wrapped up in mid-June and it ended with the Golden State Warriors taking home their first championship as a franchise since 1975. Draymond Green, a player with one of the most successful collegiate careers in recent memory who is now on his way to making more than $16 million per year, served an unexpected key role on that championship run.Green is a very talented player. He can shoot from the outside, pass exceptionally for someone his size and display great versatility on defense. But, it’s his fiery spirit and consistent passion for the sport that may be his most important asset, as it’s something that isn’t found often in the NBA.On the other hand, that passion is at the foundation of the college game and is a big reason people are so drawn to the sport, especially during the NCAA tournament. I wouldn’t be shocked to hear that four years at Michigan State played a key role in helping a guy like Green develop that fire and emotion on the court.In fact, Green said during the news conference announcing his contract extension, his college coach, Tom Izzo, made him the man he is today.“That’s the thing I love about Coach Izzo is, him raising you into a man when you get to his program is 10 times more important than what type of basketball player you become,” he said.Sooo…… Them Spartans!!!!— Draymond Green (@Money23Green) March 29, 2015Yet, it’s become a common belief, especially among NBA fans, that college basketball is simply — in the words of Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban — “unwatchable.” Among their arguments are that the players aren’t athletic enough, quick enough or strong enough, along with other complaints that can’t be avoided because, simply put, they’re amateurs.What do you expect?There is, however, a series of arguments that actually carry some weight and have been addressed for this coming season: The game is too slow. There aren’t enough points scored. Nobody wants to watch a team dribble the ball around for 30 seconds and then take a bad shot.All are legitimate and sometimes true. Scoring in many college games only reaches the 60’s and 70’s, at times with possessions seemingly dragging on forever. This is why the NCAA changed the previously 35-second shot clock to 30-seconds for the upcoming 2015-16 season and beyond. They have also cut the number of total timeouts from five to four, with the number that can carry over to the second half limited to three.The rule changes have been put in place in an effort to speed up the game, increase possessions and ultimately create a more “watchable” game.This is all happening despite the fact that people are still watching, and they’re watching more than ever before. According to the Nielsen television ratings, the average viewership of this year’s “March Madness” was the highest in 22 years, averaging 11.3 million total viewers.Thirty-eight and no: Wisconsin moves on to national championship game with stunning win over undefeated KentuckyINDIANAPOLIS – The Wisconsin men’s basketball team was able to do something no other team has done all season. No Read…The NCAA National Championship game between Wisconsin and Duke averaged 28.3 million total viewers, making it the most-watched championship game in 18 years. This is despite the fact that one of the teams in that championship game, Wisconsin, ranked 346th out of 351 NCAA Division 1 teams in pace of play, averaging just over 61 possessions per game.Déjà blue: Wisconsin’s historic season ends in heartbreaking loss to Duke in national championship gameINDIANAPOLIS – The best season in Wisconsin men’s basketball history will end on the most disappointing of notes. Wisconsin, playing Read…Yet, people continue to complain.The suggestion that college hoops is “unwatchable” doesn’t stem from the rules or shot clock or number of possessions – it never did. If anything, it stems from the new one-and-done trend in the college game. That’s what stagnates the game and ultimately makes it “unwatchable.”Kohlbeck: One-and-done wins, but the Wisconsin method is way more funThe talk around college basketball “one-and-done” players and “four-year” players is reaching its highest watermark in the history of the Read…For me, the only thing that is unwatchable about college hoops are the tears shed by student-athletes after they realize their season or career is over after the final buzzer. The outpour of emotion when they realize they will never again put on a uniform that represents what their life has been for the past four years. The coaches, players and fans all realizing they have to start all over next year. That’s unwatchable.I was in the locker room after Wisconsin’s national championship. It was overrun with emotion. Grown men were sobbing because they felt as if all their hard work was for nothing.And I couldn’t watch it.Yet, it’s that emotion that makes college basketball great. There is an all-around passion and excitement that you just don’t find in any other sport. It’s four-year guys like Draymond Green and Wisconsin’s own Frank Kaminsky showing their competitive nature on the floor, while also showing they’re still college kids off the floor, that make this sport what it is.Never been more proud of a group in my entire life. What we achieved will never be taken away from us. Thank you for having me @UWMadison— Frank Kaminsky III (@FSKPart3) April 7, 2015Having the opportunity to watch these guys grow over four years, both as basketball players and as people, is a rarity that I feel we are beginning to take for granted.Now, with so many talented players leaving school to pursue bigger and better things after just their freshman season, we don’t see the four-year college stars as often.So yes, I’m happy to see changes made to the sport that improve the pace and flow of the game, but as long as the passion, fire and emotion that make the college game so unique are all still there, I’ll be watching. I’ll always be watching.last_img read more